62

This depends a lot on your analysis of their personality. If they are reasonable, then suggesting that you edit the final submitted version will improve the English and make it less likely that the reviewers would ask for corrections should not cause blowback. "Hmmm, prof, maybe I can improve the English a bit for the final version." If they are ...


35

As @Buffy's answer says, it is probably acceptable, given that it seems you are intending to revise into a fundamentally different paper, where your colleague's contribution is no longer really present. However: are you sure you are correctly interpreting the feedback given? We can't know the specifics here, but in general testing a novel algorithm against ...


19

Is this normal? No, and it should not be. Should I withdraw? No. Presumably the results are still valid. How do I stand in this situation ethically? You yourself have done nothing wrong: it is your supervisor that is being unethical. This is NOT how science is done these days, and thankfully this kind of bribery is rare. There isn’t much you can do ...


11

It is possible that the paper can only be published ethically with you as author. This would depend on whether you made clear intellectual contributions to it. I suggest that you first get a copy of the paper and look for your own contributions. I suspect you may find them. If you do, I'd let it go, even though you don't want to be associated with them ...


10

Given what you say, it seems acceptable to remove them provided that you assure yourselves that the resulting paper has no fundamental intellectual contributions from the other person remaining. That might be easy or hard to do, but seems possible here. A supporting point is that they are both comfortable with it and also willing to continue collaboration ...


9

I have refereed many articles and reading poor English is very unpleasant. It's hard enough to understand the ideas the article is presenting without language making it harder. Also, I have had several advisors and many bosses and uniformly they all valued opinions in this order: opinion from a so-called expert opinion from someone outside the organization ...


6

Adding a co-author purely because they paid for something is definitely inconsistent with academic standards. The policies of journals and professional societies make that clear and can be cited. What you can do is add a grant number in the acknowledgments, at the end of text. That way the sponsor can list your work as part of what has been accomplished with ...


6

First, I don't understand why it is the responsibility of your professor to publish your work. Perhaps this is a local requirement, but it seems odd. Second, you can't just add someone as an author without both their proper participation and their agreement. Normally, though, if the work is yours then you can submit it. If it is joint work then all authors ...


6

A couple of considerations in addition to what has been posted so far: Many journals do not allow for changes in the author list during the revision process, with or without the co-author's approval. It is prudent to have a conversation with the Editor-in-Chief about your plan first. It is possible that the Editor-in-Chief sees the changes you plan to make ...


5

Plan B: do nothing (since the co-author is more senior) but offer to work on the revision after the paper has been submitted. Any self-respecting editor/reviewer will point out the issues with language. By offering to do the work on the revision following the reviewers' comments, you will have the last say on the language used in the paper (after all, ...


4

I would first read the paper. If it is a reasonable paper and you would be happy to be a co-author on the paper then it might be easier in your situation to let it go. I wouldn't normally suggest that, but sometimes it's better to take to the easy path (if it's not causing you harm). If you think it's a bad paper and you would not have approved it, had you ...


4

Another alternative is to submit some excerpts with "semi-grammatical" issues to a second opinion of native language and with at least some knowledge on the field and compare with your version of the text. No need to mention the whole situation, just ask which version is clearer/correct. If it happens that they agree with you most of times then ...


3

I'm sure a busy prof who has no time to write a paper covering your work would welcome the opportunity to have someone else write it. Doing so isn't simply a matter of writing it and sending it in with the prof's name on it, but handing the prof a manuscript, asking for edits, revising, ...


3

If you're actually writing part of the paper, and actually doing analysis and interpreting the results of the data, then yes you can ask. If it's providing suggestions "try this method/program/analysis" and letting them do the rest, then I'd say being mentioned in the acknowledgements sounds like enough credit.


2

Maybe you should have a joint session. Both of you sit side-by-side in front of a computer and make the final edits together. You two can discus every formulation. The advantage is, you get a better feeling of what your advisor wants to express, you can help him finding the right words, and you can let it go once you sense anger or other negative vibes.


2

You are asking them to devote not insignificant effort to what is clearly fairly low on their priority list. Yes, they've agreed to that, yes, it's long past due it goes one way or another... But some people are just terrible at time management (including myself). If that prof is anything like myself, don't read much into it - it's not malice or anything, it'...


1

You'll need to convince the journal that it actually is a mistake as opposed to gift authorship. If you do convince them then yes, you can add an author.


1

I wouldn't do that. That coauthorship doesn't look granted for free, considering the history of the manuscript. Unless the paper was rejected, but it does not seem to be the case. And personally, even resubmitting what would look a different paper I would likely maintain that person in the coauthor list.


1

You are in an abusive relationship. Supervisor and student is an interpersonal relationship, and just like with any interpersonal relationship, there are cases of abuse. Sadly, academia is full of such abusive situations. Don't walk, run! As with any abusive relationship, it's not going to get better no matter what you do. It will only get worse. You are in ...


1

Well, first, selling authorships for a conference publication is like selling your soul for a hamburger. Nobody needs a conference publication that bad, though on the plus side, it's a conference so most likely nobody will ever care. Second, yeah, it's unethical, and it's not how research works. "A friend" of mine once had a boss who had a habit of ...


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