21

Most people apply for positions while still students. That is normal. The "date of hire" could mean various things, depending on the institution. Don't worry too much about it, and apply. If there is any sort of issue they might be able to finesse it a bit, but likely they intend that early 2021 graduates are part of their intended outreach. The ...


13

No sane committee is ever going to turn down a candidate solely for being 'too experienced', and it is rarely meaningful to reduce someone's CV and accumulated experience to just a few numbers. However, this comes with some qualifications: If someone is reaching career milestones (e.g. first Asst. Prof. job) much later than the norm, a committee might ...


11

Talk to your advisor. It is absolutely possible for a person to get hired for a tenure track position straight out of their PhD (and when that happens, the person must have applied before they graduated). I know several people who had that happen to them. So in that sense, you are overthinking things. However, I’ll repeat: talk to your advisor. Just because ...


9

Quite a lot of the context of this question seems quite specific to UK STEM, and in particular biology and medical science departments. So some things to be clear about in terms of UK STEM departments: There is no tenure/untenured distinction in the UK. No academic in the UK is tenured. But all academics that have been in post for more than 2 years in the ...


6

This answer has not been updated in response to the question edit war. The question is confused about several things. It would be very unusual to get dismissed for inadequate teaching. Grants have nothing to do with it. The penalty for bad teaching is that you do not get a new contract. This is distinct from dismissal. Dismissal is used for major ...


6

I work at a government research institution in Germany. We consist of a number of institutes. In the last decade, our president has worked on strengthening ties to close-by universities (we have institutes at different locations). As a result, there are now strategic cooperations in place. The most important one being that new institute leaders ...


6

When an employer hires someone to do a job, in academia or anywhere else, their goal is to hire the best person to do that job, according to some notion that the people in charge of hiring have of what “best” means. Now, you can reasonably disagree with someone else’s idea of what “best” means and think that they’d be making a mistake to hire person X over ...


6

Note: the question has been edited a number of times, but now it’s reasonably clear what is being asked so I’ll have a go at answering. Hope it doesn’t get rewritten again.... Have universities created any mechanisms to prevent Heads of Departments arriving in this situation ? I think your question contains an interesting and somewhat subtle fallacy about ...


5

Here in the US, an assistant professor is an entry-level tenure track appointment but does not come with tenure. An associate professor is the next level up and does come with tenure. Tenure track appointments virtually always require a PhD but not necessarily from a US institution. A lecturer appointment is a teaching position, almost never comes with ...


4

All that I really can say is what will not describe "creation of exams". In some versions of English, "writing an exam" would mean "taking the exam" in other English. That is, being an examinee, rather than an examiner. "Setting an exam" in some contexts is understood as "creating the exam", but seldom in the ...


4

In my field (particle physics) positions considered as "faculty equivalent" positions are usually non-university permanent (or close to that) positions. For example, in the US at national labs, there are several named fellowships and when applying to them they might state something like "this position is considered equivalent to an assistant ...


4

At which point (if there is such a point) is someone considered too old (in terms of experience) for an Assist. Prof. position? I don't think there's a common answer to this question. All else being equal, the only real downside in hiring someone older for a Asst. Prof position is that they have a shorter time before retirement at that institution. ...


3

For the European countries I've seen the answer would be similar: Visiting researcher is not really a type of (funded) position, but a status. PhD students might do a research visit as part of their doctoral studies while still being paid by their home institution, sometimes supported by a travel grant to cover travel and housing costs. There are also post-...


3

"Lecturer" is the main entry-point academic rank in the UK system, and spans quite a wide range of pay grades: someone at the top of the lecturer pay bracket can easily have 10-15 years more experience than someone at the bottom. Promotion is usually to Senior Lecturer, and then to Reader and Professor. Nearly all Professors will have started out ...


3

First, get tenure. If your current path works for that then you have time for the longer run. Get that done. But one of the ways to build a long term research program is to do it in collaboration with others. If you have a few people (three is enough) in your department that share research ideas in general, you can form a weekly seminar that meets for an ...


2

The job listing says These positions require a Ph.D....at date of hire So the requirement raises one question: Will the applicant have the degree, at the date of hire? But if I act before graduation, will my potential application be considered when I have not yet sealed my Ph.D.? Yes, your application will be considered if it notes that you will have ...


2

At the R1 where I got my social science PhD, I'd estimate that 75% of senior faculty in my department switched jobs at least once before gaining tenure. Usually these moves were from one R1 to another, although usually from institutions considered less prestigious than this one. A few moved from R2/R3 or SLACs to this R1. That being said, maybe my field and ...


2

A PhD is a PhD... it doesn't matter how long it takes, or whether it is full or part-time, the qualification itself is unaffected. Amount of research produced over a certain duration has got some importance though. The crucial question is the reason for the PhD being part-time. If that reason would reflect badly on your perceived fit as an academic, then it ...


2

Probably a matter of opinion, but I would suggest focusing on more general things overall, though you could say that you have well developed ideas for a course in X and in Y. But I think that the teaching statement needs to focus on your teaching philosophy and expertise, rather than details. I say this because what you suggest seems to make you too narrowly ...


1

Assuming both jobs are in the same department: Ask the contact person. (If that contact person won't be on the hiring committee, then get in contact with someone who is.) Assuming both jobs are in different departments: (IMO) Departments are independent and two applications will not overlap at the department level. (They will, of course, overlap within the ...


1

Since there seems to be some uncertainty in the other answer / comment thread, I will offer my point of view. (I'm a MCF in a French university.) If you just want the answer, skip to the section that starts by It depends below. You are misreading the information available. Qualification was removed for PR jobs. It remains mandatory in most cases to be a ...


1

I don't have a definitive answer because this is the first time I hear about this, but from following the links you provided, here is what I think is happening. First some comments. "link2" further links to the actual text of the law, but I don't think you really want to read it. It is very, very long. Next, you early on in your question equate ...


1

(Moving from comment to answer) This may not be true everywhere, but when faced with a similar decision I was told that the more established professor is more familiar with the department politics and how to get students graduated. Graduation should be a top priority, and if Professor X has a good track record of graduating students, that may be the best ...


1

When you change departments, even within a university, your research progress towards tenure needs to be negotiated as part of your offer. Even within similar fields (say, computer engineering and computer science), standards vary widely. Some comp. engineering departments place a lot of stock on journal publications (I turned down such an offer because I ...


1

I think it is unlikely, not impossible, that your rank would be reduced at a given institution, but might be if you change universities, especially when moving to a new field. It is also possible to move up in rank, even within a given institution, but it might take some special action to do so. When changing institution, rank is probably negotiable. If they ...


1

When you receive your job offer, it will offer you a specific position/rank. It would be unusual to offer someone a lower rank than they already have, but not inconceivable when moving between universities (i.e. moving from Northern State University to Harvard). It would be very unusual for a department within your university to offer you in effect a ...


1

It isn't too early to explore your options. If there is a position or two that you would really rather have and are willing to put up with a bit of hassle, then you should apply. If you can keep it a bit private for a while it would be good, I think. If your evaluation of the chair is shared, you can probably get a recommendation from a colleague or two, and,...


1

It is unclear to me 'why' you want to give the job more time. Do you expect your workload to decrease? Do you expect your chair to become more reasonable? For academia to change their approach to work/life balance? If the answer to all (or even most) of the questions like this are 'no', then there is no point in waiting. And from my personal experience, the ...


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