33

I was told that there isn't really a step up from postdoc (like an assistant professor) until you get a professorship (for which you have to do habilitation among other things). In Germany, there is generally a greater variety in career paths than, say, in the US, where the vast majority of new full profs have been assistant profs at some point. It's ...


30

the position is called "Assistant Professor" If you hold an appointment as an assistant professor, then you are an assistant professor. Still, I understand your concern.... kinda makes no sense due to the size of the institution and the lack of research required by it...however this is a bit of a no-name brand institution Context is everything. I ...


21

Here two pieces of advice: As a mid/long term perspective you should build a large network with bright people. In the beginning talk to as many as possible. Tell them about your ideas and ask them about theirs. This will lead to a lot of collaborative papers. Don't waste too much time with people who are reluctant. Most people will be very open (especially ...


21

To stand out from the rest of the applicants and to bring to attention the application to the head of the department (HOD), would emailing the HOD enhance my application or would it affect it negatively. Realistically, it does not affect your application at all. Firstly, this does not make you "stand out" nearly as much as you think it does, because quite a ...


16

Academic titles are not something you award yourself. In the US, Assistant Professor has a specific meaning and is assigned by a university. Other places it may have no meaning at all. But, I think people would react poorly to you doing that. Your title is Lecturer, as you state. Use that, and only that until you are awarded a different one. Even if you ...


13

Can I call myself an assistant professor without a PhD I think the problem here is that you don't get to choose what to "call yourself" (in professional contexts, particularly in your CV). Your job title is chosen by your employer. What you have control over is whether to take the job or not. If you took a job that has the title "Assistant Professor", then ...


13

First, the person most involved with a search is the chair of the search committee. Sometimes this is the HoD, but often it is not. Sometimes the HoD is on the search committee and sometimes they are not. Often, and in my opinion ideally, the HoD is not involved in the search until the end. Now to answer your question. If you know someone in the department ...


10

While really short, 10 minute job talks in the UK are the standard and I actually think they work pretty well in that they do a good job of weeding people out. Sure, there were applicants that we turned down because they screwed up the job talk, but generally if the job talk went well, we were happy with the candidate. The best job talks accomplish 4 things. ...


10

So besides "working hard", what are some tips, comments and advices on start to setting up a "publication pipeline"? As Lordy's answer points out, the key to a regular stream of publications is a healthy network of collaborators: external collaborators but also the students or postdocs that you supervise and consequenly who follow your research agenda. So ...


7

I can only speak to common practice in the US. Other places may differ. That is something to be negotiated as part of the process of accepting the new position. I doubt that many universities have fixed rules, other than being open to considering it. For some people it is an advantage to get "credit", shortening the probationary period. This would be ...


6

While collaboration is important, I would caution you to get too hung up on this. You want to avoid being the person that just hangs around in the middle of the publication list in many papers - in my experience people eventually develop a bad taste towards scientists that they perceive to be freeriders on other's top research. Instead, in my experience the ...


5

It is uncommon for people to move up from a teaching school to an R1 school. It happens, but rarely, and your chances are slim. So this seems like a dead end regarding your goal, though of course teaching can be quite satisfying for a lot of us. The offer of a postdoc elsewhere at least allows you to continue dreaming about a permanent position at an R1 ...


4

I do not suggest this. You should probably be tailoring the presentation to be aimed at 1st, or maybe 2nd, year students/classes and you should attempt to make the lecture be understandable to non-majors. You should be pretending that the audience of the class is a general elective audience. While in actual practice a lecture in a class does not need to be ...


4

It depends: There are W1 professorships with a tenure track, and there are those without. If there is a tenure track, then that is usually prominently advertised, and more importantly, in writing. If there is nothing about tenure in writing, then the safe assumption is that you won't get tenure, and you will have to leave after 6 years. Verbal assurances ...


3

I think this strongly depends on the field. In pure mathematics, I think nobody would be the slightest impressed by "represented my university in the future research leader summit, which managed to heap 25 nobel laureates into a big pile". It might even have a slightly silly and vain vibe (whereas everyone would be ecstatic about an invited talk at the ICM)...


3

If I were you, I would also consider the connections that you might be able to create at such a venue. If you get the chance to present before nobel laureates, it might just happen that they like your work and know of an open position at their home university. The more powerful people know your work, your name and your face, the better. There are many ways ...


3

I would think of it the same as any other conference presentation. Ask your colleagues, supervisors, mentors, etc, how well they regard this particular conference, and whether they think it is worth your time to attend and present. But you need to get advice from people who know you and are in your field. The fact that this conference happens to be called ...


2

Congratulations on your interview! Let me answer from the perspective of a current academic staff member at an institution like the one you describe. I'll give a few general points, rather than focusing on your questions individually. Of course, these are based on my personal experience and point of view, so don't take them as gospel. First, be aware that ...


2

This answer is a bit speculative so use caution in accepting the advice. You have only a few minutes and they will slip by quickly. I would focus on work in progress and on funding opportunities. If the audience is well familiar with your field, you could spend a bit of time on how you can appeal to grad students (whether as advisor or co-advisor). The ...


2

This seems clearly to favor the postdoc position. Teaching 6 courses per year, likely not just 6 sections of one or two courses, will leave you no time for research in any field. Moreover, if everyone else is doing this then there won't be a lot of research synergy that will help you build up your CV. On the other hand, working in an R1 institution doing ...


2

Take some time for you. If your dissertation is solid and ready to go...no time like the present to get started and get it published in a journal! As far as beginning a new research project - I think it depends on your area and your expectations for research (see below). Since you are teaching, take a look at fall semesters teaching responsibilities. I ...


2

If you want to mention your research at all, consider the following plan. The think you really want to avoid is being overly pedantic and going over the head of the likely audience. Pitch the talk at undergraduates. In such a talk, you don't want to try to impress people with your brilliance. It is more important to stress that you are inspiring. Save ...


1

If the announcement of the position says that it's a tenure-track position, then towards the end of the 6 years there will be a formal evaluation procedure and if you pass that you will get tenured. If this is not mentioned in the announcement, then there is no formal procedure foreseen. That does usually not preclude getting tenure at the same place, but it ...


1

In my lecture series, I talk about my research too. So it is not necessarily forbidden to teach about your research work. However, the presentation must be tailored towards a student audience. Whenever you give a research presentation to an audience of your peers, you can typically assume that your audience is up to speed with the state-of-the-art work in ...


1

"Professor" is a courtesy title so your official offer letter is the official arbiter of this, along with whatever the campus directory lists you as. If your offer letter says something like "... the position of Assistant Professor in ... " then you are a professor, if it says "... the position of Lecturer in ..." then it wouldn't be appropriate to be called ...


1

If you believe, as I do, that students learn from practice and feedback, not from seeing or hearing something once or twice, course design focuses on student tasks first. First decide what they will do to master the material of the course. Whether that is projects or exercises or exam prep (ugh) or whatever. Lay that out. All key concepts should have ...


1

This is becoming more common. Younger workers are savvy about good opportunities and moving is not that big a deal to us. I think the baby boomers look at relocating as a far more disruptive thing than we do. I changed jobs and moved this last year and it was no big deal. I'm single and don't own a home so I can take advantage of good opportunities. Plus, if ...


1

First, congratulations on your interview. Preparing well and asking questions here is a good step. You may be surprised how little the other candidates have done. Hopefully the other answers all give some insight. I hope to add some more. My (limited) experience of job interviews of this type normally focus on what you will bring and how you will link to ...


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