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In a typical university in the United States: An assistant professor is an entry-level faculty member. They are generally on the tenure track (although the term "assistant professor" does not guarantee this) but do not have tenure yet. Typically, within about seven years an assistant professor will either be promoted to associate professor or will leave ...


57

It's perfectly normal to feel the way you do. Part of it is likely fear of the unknown; part is fear of a new job with "adult" responsibilities; part of it might even be fear about whether you can do the job (the infamous Imposter Syndrome). Transitions are always a stressful time, and I don't think we give ourselves enough time to adjust. This also ...


57

There's nothing bad about this; it's pretty common, especially for advanced graduate courses. You don't have to be secretive about it. But here are a few things to consider. First, time. As a new assistant professor you are going to be busier than you ever imagined. Are you sure this is the best use of three hours a week? Keep in mind that taking this ...


56

For example: Their salaries are far lower. (The discrepancy varies by department, high in the physical sciences, low in economics and business.) In fields that receive startup packages, their startup packages are far lower. Many schools cannot hire a proven superstar, but they can take a gamble on a bright young scholar and help her develop into a superstar ...


55

Yes, you can call any kind of professor a professor, and you should. Addressing someone as "assistant professor" or "associate professor" would be...well, it's simply not done, so I can't say if it would be rude or just weird. It is similar to military protocol, actually: e.g. if someone is a rear or vice admiral, you call them admiral. In contrast to the ...


49

Express that you have enjoyed working in your department. (Even if this is not entirely true.) Explain that you are only leaving because of an opportunity "too exciting to turn down." Don't volunteer exactly why it is exciting; if asked, talk about what you'll be doing, not what you'll be paid. If there's a way you can help the department while you're in ...


47

In the Netherlands both assistant and associate professors are frequently tenured (= have a permanent position). Associate professors are expected to develop their own research line, while assistant professors can work on the topics of their bosses (full professors). Neither assistant nor associate professors can formally supervise PhD students: they can ...


41

Yes you can. The "Assistant Professor" still teaches. The word Assistant is there to denote the rank within the academic system. Some have taught longer and are more accomplished and are rewarded accordingly. Actually, calling the person "Assistant Professor Jones" would be very awkward and cumbersome. It should be avoided.


36

Assistant professors are not inferior versions of full professors. Aside from years of experience, there will usually be many differences between two candidates. Young does not mean not as good (it will when I celebrate my 60-th birthday later this year, though). The assistant professor may hold an advantage in a specific field or in general. A department ...


36

15 days ago was the weekend before Christmas, 5 days ago was new years day. I am not surprised the assistant hasn't answered: my university is closed till Monday. Since I have children and the school and kindergarten are also closed till Monday, I have very little time for answering emails. Moreover, this is the time of year to focus on other things than ...


33

I was told that there isn't really a step up from postdoc (like an assistant professor) until you get a professorship (for which you have to do habilitation among other things). In Germany, there is generally a greater variety in career paths than, say, in the US, where the vast majority of new full profs have been assistant profs at some point. It's ...


31

Is this a serious question? I would refuse to work anywhere where my employer would require me to do such a test. It is simply none of their business. I am actually not aware of any (European) university that would require anyone to take a drug test. In fact, it would be illegal in many countries to do this (or at least, there are very strict rules about ...


30

In Germany you will be subjected to a medical examination if you become a civil servant. Full professors (W3) are typically civil servants. The levels below that (W1 and W2), are typically also civil servants, though not permanent and the examination tends to be a bit easier. Post-docs (TVL 13 or 14) are typically "normal" employees, and those are not ...


30

the position is called "Assistant Professor" If you hold an appointment as an assistant professor, then you are an assistant professor. Still, I understand your concern.... kinda makes no sense due to the size of the institution and the lack of research required by it...however this is a bit of a no-name brand institution Context is everything. I ...


29

Yes, you can call an assistant or associate professor "Professor." That's completely normal practice. The only time it might be inappropriate is if you are writing them in a formal context. "Prof. Smith" is always OK, but saying "Mary Smith, Professor of Unusual Studies" isn't really appropriate if Smith is an assistant or associate professor.


26

There's no way that you are going to be disqualified from faculty positions by not having a graduate student fellowship. There's no "has a fellowship" checkbox on rubric that search committees use. What will matter is a holistic evaluation of the quality of your research, your publications, your teaching experience, and your letters of recommendation. Of ...


25

While drug testing is very common in the USA, this is not the case world wide. In the UK it is rare. The uk government advises Employers should: limit testing to employees that need to be tested ensure the tests are random not single out particular employees for testing unless this is justified by the nature of their jobs ...


23

Isn't it wrong that an inexperienced assistant professor (who is not far from his PhD studentship days) can take control of one or several PhD students? Don't it reduce the education/research quality? For certain institutes I've been in, I would find myself asking the opposite question: isn't it wrong for senior professors to supervise students when they ...


23

This is really dependent on your department culture. Officially (at least for all the tenure systems I've participated in), tenure decisions are based on the quality, reputation, and impact of the candidate's research (and to a lesser extent, teaching and service), and their potential for future intellectual leadership and international stature. (Woo, that'...


23

It depends what the co-authors did. If they were involved in the work they should normally be authors of the paper. I think the important questions you need to answer are: What exactly do you mean by "showed no interest after repeated calls"? I have never heard of someone who does not want a "free" paper published, unless they disagree with the methods or ...


22

In Australia, the typical hierarchy is: Level A. Associate lecturer Level B. Lecturer Level C. Senior lecturer Level D. Associate professor Level E. Professor In the typical Australian ranking system, there is no "assistant professor" . In this academic ranking system associate professor is a high ranking. I think that both associate professor and ...


22

When I was in grad school, I worked as a resident advisor in the grad student dorms, and a big chunk of my job was to be there for other graduate students when they needed help or someone to talk to. My supervisor taught me to ask "What are your concerns?" when people came to me to express that they were afraid or nervous about something. I was quite amazed ...


21

In France, the position Assistant Professor is a permanent position. As research activities are also done in labs in addition to the universities, the positions are: assistant professor (maître de conférences) : permanent teaching position, but can not supervise PhD students alone. Is typically working towards a habilitation (HDR, habilitation à diriger ...


21

In North America, one would only mention an academic's rank (assistant professor, associate professor, full professor, etc) in formal contexts where it is important to describe their exact job title (in a CV, business card, news article, etc). Otherwise, the word "professor" is used generically to refer to any tenure-stream university faculty members, and ...


21

To stand out from the rest of the applicants and to bring to attention the application to the head of the department (HOD), would emailing the HOD enhance my application or would it affect it negatively. Realistically, it does not affect your application at all. Firstly, this does not make you "stand out" nearly as much as you think it does, because quite a ...


21

Here two pieces of advice: As a mid/long term perspective you should build a large network with bright people. In the beginning talk to as many as possible. Tell them about your ideas and ask them about theirs. This will lead to a lot of collaborative papers. Don't waste too much time with people who are reluctant. Most people will be very open (especially ...


20

Assistant and Associate Professors in the US can be formally addressed by "Professor" or "Doctor/Dr.". There should be no offense given with either salutation, and either is appropriate.


20

In a system like the US, a "more experienced professor" typically has tenure already. Someone who has tenure won't want to give it up. Therefore, if you want to recruit them, you have to offer them tenure as well, either from the moment they walk in the door or very shortly thereafter. Otherwise they are not going to take the job you are offering. This ...


19

I know of no American university in which any tenure track faculty member works under any other tenure track faculty member in any official capacity. The main difference between assistant professors and full professors is that assistant professors do not have tenure. (Going far enough back in the history of my department, one sees "tenured assistant ...


18

You can certainly try to politely negotiate salary, but I wouldn't count on getting much if anything at all. At my institution, my experience has been that the administration simply won't negotiate on salary. For a VAP, the department is simply looking for someone who can handle teaching load for a year or two. There are typically many qualified ...


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