9

I think this problem is widespread enough that it shouldn't be a problem, provided that you make people aware of it. You suggest a note in your CV and that should be fine. It could appear elsewhere also. If you are questioned on it or someone makes a mistake in thinking you are acting improperly, just inform them of the issues. I think people will, in ...


5

Yes, include it. It should be on your CV also. Tenth author can mean a lot or a little, but it is still an author. In my field, with your name, you would probably be listed near first, but if your family name was Waters, probably last. But the important point is that you are an author of anything published under your name. And certainly don't restrict it to ...


5

That sort of employment is unnecessary to include and will be of no benefit if you do. I suggest only doing so if you need to account for a long gap. Even then, you should say why that was necessary to do. And, if you are in mathematics, as the "handle" implies, write about anything you did that was productive in that field. It might even be better ...


4

I don't see any problem with adding additional collaborative projects, but make sure you can finish something and aren't stretching yourself so thin that you make no progress. There's nothing wrong with exploring research interests, if anything, it's a benefit. But you also want to show you have some follow-through. It's completely different to have started ...


3

This sort of thing is always a strategic decision. While some readers will appreciate the clarification, for others it may serve to highlight something that would otherwise not have attracted attention. I suggest seeking advice from professors at your current institution, who can comment on how your overall application looks. If you do decide to address it, ...


2

I doubt that it would be seen negatively by most reviewers, but who can speak for everyone. It shows some evidence of seriousness. But it might not be necessary, in fact, especially if this is for application to a US institution where the acceptance is based on an overall assessment of the likelihood of success without individual small things having much ...


2

Yes, it's appropriate to apply again. Possibly they re-advertised it because they didn't get enough qualified applications the first time. They might have a policy, for example, that they re-advertise if they don't get at least three applications good enough to be invited for interview. It's possible they considered yours good enough, but that too few ...


2

Would it be okay to submit a portion of this as a writing sample for my phd applications? Yes. (Personally, I'd submit the whole paper.) Or is this not allowed since I'm just a research assistant and not a co-author? You should make the circumstances clear, e.g., the seed idea was the professor's, the literature review is yours, your literature review ...


2

Even before you try to answer this, think about developing an "Elevator Talk" about your research. The idea is that if someone bumps in to you in the elevator and asks about your research you can explain it in the two minutes you have in the ride. Think about the key question(s) you are asking. Think about how you approach the solutions. Think a ...


2

In general it is a good idea to list all positive/relevant experience. But if you are worried about it being misleading, just put a date on the item, listing when the project ended, or the start and end dates. People can do their own math. But leaving it out entirely seems a mistake to me.


2

It is hard to see how doing research, especially collaborative research, could be a bad thing. If someone (and there may be a few) would mark you down for that then you probably don't want to work with them in any case. However, an advisor would probably want some commitment from you that you will focus on the research you do with them. That is natural. But ...


1

Why ask? You can infer this yourself by simply looking into their prior research. Researchers don't change trajectories if they want to become experts in their domains.


1

From what I understand, GRE is one of the lesser important factors in whether a department should decide to admit a student or not. Since a PhD is about research, research experience/potential/output is what people care about in this case, not so much numbers like GPA/GRE. If the department requires it regardless, then there's nothing you can do about that....


1

I would assume, but can't guarantee, that if they have a policy that GRE scores are optional then the policy would preclude assumptions about missing scores. So, in that sense you are probably safe. But, you can hardly control for what an individual committee member might have in the back of their mind. It might even be possible to learn more about the ...


1

But how precisely am I supposed to give the topic of my doctoral thesis? Is it sufficient to have a broader view of the topic and themes the working group is dealing with or is it necessary to formulate the concrete topic of my planned thesis? In general, most hiring PIs will want to see that you have "done your homework", that is, you have a good ...


1

I would suggest that you be as open and honest with your current supervisor as you can. No surprises, no evasion. Tell him your list of schools. Tell him you want to aim as high as you possibly can. From your current A+ school, possibly to an A++ school. I have known some students in your position. A student who excels under a professor makes the prof look ...


1

Speaking as someone who did apply to his own undergraduate institution for a graduate program, and as someone whos institution has two programs within the same department (although I did not apply to both). I don't think it will have a big impact on your chances of getting accepted into a single program, here is why I say this. At my institution they have ...


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