Hot answers tagged

35

Do I put my undergraduate university as my affiliation because I was educated there? Absolutely not. That could be considered fraudulent, since it would suggest you are still affiliated with this university. You should only list an affiliation if it applies now or applied while the work was done, and in the latter case you should note if it has changed (...


33

The standard practice is to list the affiliations under which the work was performed. If you performed the work as an undergraduate at your undergraduate institution, then you should continue to list it in work related to that effort. However, you can "update" your address by listing a "current address" along with the old affiliations.


23

Why are you concerned about expectations? After you get your parchment, your school no longer has anything to give to you. What you give is purely from your own generosity -- because you feel by giving back to the school, others will benefit. You give because you feel it is the right thing to do. You give because you want the school to purchase that lab ...


11

Aside from the more obvious choice of making donations of money (for which there is practically no upper bound, and the entire expenditure may not be as transparent as you'd like it to be), there can be an equally valuable way of helping your alma mater: Your time. It may be as simple as giving a graduation speech (for the more famous/successful alums who ...


10

What can a mentor gain from the mentor/mentee relationship? Altruistic answers: Passing on learned knowledge and lessons is a hallmark of a society. What you learned as a student, employee, employer, citizen, etc. is important so that once your brain and the brains of others in your generation are pushing up daisies, the knowledge isn't lost, and repeating ...


9

I disagree with Damien's answer for the specific case of your question. A graduate of the department, who knows you very well and can write a good letter of recommendation, is worth just as much as the "big name," because she is familiar with the department as it is currently operating, and would be able to place your work in context of people also known in ...


8

I view this as "paying it forward": someone who has received good mentoring advice should pass this onwards to others. In addition, it's a way of encouraging promising young talent, and making sure they make their way through a challenging transition (from high school to college graduate is a big change!), and prepare them for their careers in the future. ...


7

Do not intervene. It won't work, and may damage you. Political and ecological matters can be highly divisive. No project has zero impact, so even if everybody agrees about the facts, strong disagreements in the balancing of pros and cons are likely to remain. Therefore, the most likely outcome of trying to intervene is that you make enemies, without ...


7

The customs about alumni associations depend very strongly on the country: alumni donations in US institutions (for example) contributes in part to their funding, while in France it ranges from nonexistant (for small institutions) to negligible. However, one role of alumni associations which has not been detailed in the other answers is the role it can play ...


6

I have published together with authors that only used their personal home address + email address as contact information, so your second option should not be a problem. You can publish in scientific journals without a formal affiliation. However, if the work was performed at a previous location (e.g. as a student) where you are not currently working, you ...


6

From the mentor point of view, I think one important practical benefits of mentoring/tutoring is that it gives you access to a pool of students (your mentees, as you put it), from which you may find future interns/grad students/post-docs. This access can be used to try and recruit them, either for yourself, or within your network (or your field in general). ...


5

Yes, here is an example. A quantitative assessment of the 'long-term costs and benefits' is complicated by the subjective aspects of many parameters. For example, some individuals value salary over independence, other don't. But my alma mater, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) does objective surveys and statistics on alumni employment. These ...


3

The following should be an acceptable affiliation for your specified occupation. Independent Researcher


3

You have a good start (how much flexibility is allowed to the students with regard to taking courses, choosing co-advisors, as well as about how the PhD process works, what the most important milestones are and what particular challenges one should be wary of). Note that how the PhD process works is something you might want to leave out because the ...


2

Affiliation does not mean necessarily an academic place of work. The best option is to just use a current place of work. Write "self-employed" if you do not like the above idea. This would mean that you have self-employed yourself at home to conduct the submitted research. I would not recommend the old place of study, since you are not there, you cannot be ...


1

A person who drops out is technically an alumnus however the term normally is used for someone who actually graduated. It can refer to anyone who is a former student or even employee of an institution.


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