46

The logos on your poster should indicate the author's affiliation. Use the logo of the presenting author's university. Never use the organizer, sponsor, or host logo unless you work for them. People attending the conference already know what conference they are at. This information is not needed on a poster.


44

Generally the opposite is true in the United States -- the university wishes to have jurisdiction over all work done using university resources -- which includes the laptops and computers we use. Since faculty are exempt employees presumably we have no "free time," but instead work 24x7 for the university (except for the summer months for 9-month employees). ...


41

I disagree pretty strenuously with what you have done. First of all, being an alumnus is not an "affiliation". If you weren't a student or employee of the university at the time you did the work, it's not your affiliation and should not be listed as such. You're welcome to list your alumni email address if you like, but that's your contact information, ...


40

I published a paper with two high school student co-authors. I listed their high school as their affiliation. They were not paid by the university. It worked fine.


39

Let's call a spade a spade here: This policy is not common. I have never heard of a faculty member in a developed country being dictated to in which area to publish or being limited in using their university affiliation only when publishing in certain areas and not in others. This policy is not logical. Let's see, who is more competent to judge if a faculty ...


38

None. Outside/commercial email addresses are more likely to be permanent than academic ones, since people change jobs all the time. I think that a Gmail or Yahoo address is fine, and I rarely look at them when reviewing. Some venues use double-blind reviewing, so the reviewers won't know your email address or affiliation anyway.


37

The crucial point is: Why would the author lie? Let's try some hypothetical answers: To bluff the editors and reviewers so that they think you're at a top place. But reviewers will likely be from your field of study and realize that you lie. They would probably know it if you moved to a high-ranking institution. To make the paper look good in your CV. This ...


35

Do I put my undergraduate university as my affiliation because I was educated there? Absolutely not. That could be considered fraudulent, since it would suggest you are still affiliated with this university. You should only list an affiliation if it applies now or applied while the work was done, and in the latter case you should note if it has changed (...


32

I don't think there are any "official rules". (I can't even find a clause in my employment contract that officially requires me to list my university on my papers.) But as long as you are a student, it's a good idea to list your university as an affiliation. Even if the university isn't paying you, you do benefit indirectly from the intellectual ...


31

The standard practice is to list the affiliations under which the work was performed. If you performed the work as an undergraduate at your undergraduate institution, then you should continue to list it in work related to that effort. However, you can "update" your address by listing a "current address" along with the old affiliations.


31

The first thing to do is to check if the university has any recommendations about this. If none exist, then the second aspect is to consider if the university is well known under one or another form of the name. The purpose of providing an affiliation and proper address is for the sake of communication. Before e-mail and Internet, most correspondence went by ...


31

As noted by @mankoff in a comment on Does one need to be affiliated with a university to publish papers?, you can use "Independent Scholar": Here is a recent paper published by someone affiliated as "Independent Scholar": dx.doi.org/10.1175/BAMS-D-12-00171.1


26

If you have written the publication only with the resources and support of the former employer, then it is perfectly acceptable to do what you have written, and list the old address as your address for the "active" affiliations, and include a "present address" affiliation to show your updated physical location. However, if your new employer does provide ...


25

To my mind, this case is very similar to the question of whether somebody can essentially pay for co-authorship. We see many questions of this sort on this site, a particular apropos example of which is this one, which asks in part: Suppose I'm a billionaire who knows nothing about science, but I take it into my head that I want to be (regarded as) a ...


22

I would argue that it's a question of resources—if you have used resources (equipment, personnel, computers, financial) of both institutions in executing the paper before its initial submission, then you should list both institutes as supporting the work. On the other hand, if the core of the work—both research and writing—were done at the old institution, ...


21

One unwritten rule of any scientific collaboration between co-authors is that each party should trust the other. If I collaborate on one paper with another scientist (who might be located in another part of the world) and he is affiliated with more than one institutions (e.g., a university and a research institute or a second university while on sabbatical) ...


21

There are two main paths here: You can list yourself as an independent researcher, which is appropriate if you are not doing this "on the clock" at your current position and use no company resources. You can list yourself under your current employer, which is appropriate if you are doing this using work time and/or company resources, even if the work is not ...


20

I think that most English speakers will recognise that "Universidade" means "University", especially in an academic context, so there's no need to translate the term. On the other hand, if you were referring to something less obvious to English-speakers, like 고려대학교, I'd add "(Korea University)".


20

According to http://arxiv.org/help/endorsement : Existing submitters will not require endorsement to submit papers on topics that they've been active in. Once you've submitted successfully, you're in for life. If you change fields (e.g. from physics to biology or something) you might have to be endorsed. As I understand it, the endorsement system is ...


20

A journal is interested in whether the submitted article is, Appropriate in subject matter for that journal Of a suitable standard for that journal (as advised by reviewers) In an ideal world, neither of these things is indicated by affiliation - so why should they care?


18

The co-author of my recently accepted paper works at Microsoft. The paper has absolutely nothing to do with her job, so we specified her affiliation as "Independent Researcher".


17

My immediate reaction is to put them both on; It is not unusual to have two affiliations. I then mean to state "A and B" to show a shared affiliation. That way both departments could benefit from your publication. The question is then how to get the different departments to losen up their purses. In my system no such funding is typically given out by ...


17

I have faced this problem in a previous publication, and what I did was list my current employer as my affiliation, with an asterisk, stating that "Large part of this research work was carried out while I was with the ..."


17

There are several answers here. They quite probably already do so (eg if a claimed affiliation to a prestigious institution looks too good to be true, or unlikely given other information, or a reviewer says "hey, wait..."), but on an informal and ad-hoc basis, rather than doing it for the 99% of unremarkable cases. They usually don't need to. Most ...


16

tl;dr: Endorsing such paper bears high risk and promises a low reward. Long answer: Not many academics these days write outside of their narrow scope of expertise. Clearly, there is no general policy or practice of how institutions deal with such rare situations as they occur; every administrator probably comes out with an ad hoc solution based on their ...


15

I don't see where it says that you must have a institutional affiliation, Reading comprehension is not my strength. It also says that you must represent your affiliation correctly. If your current employment is concerned with certain areas of Computer Science or Mathematics (and your paper is in a related area) this will probably count. Otherwise, I'd ...


15

Speaking as a scientist who works and publishes frequently from my position at a tech company: his affiliated institution is his company, and it is entirely normal and appropriate to list it as such. It would be incorrect to list his affiliated institution as his alma mater, since he is no longer employed by them. Note: My answer assumes there is no ...


15

Affiliation isn't a commodity to buy and sell. It is simply a statement that at the time of researching and writing this article, you were affiliated (as a student, employee, or similar) with a particular organization. From your question, it sounds like at the time of researching and writing the article, you were a student or employee of Chelyabinsk State ...


15

I have certainly never heard of any such policy. It makes no sense. The university is giving away free good publicity for being named on another research paper. And an individual faculty member being successful by authoring another paper is also good for the department, the university, and everyone who's in this together. The policy simply makes no sense ...


15

First of all, calm down. This is not as big of a mistake as you think it is. Many if not most published work contains insignificant mistakes such as minor typos. If it would make you feel better, I once had a typo in my own name (I blame autocorrection). Contact the editor. They are probably going to publish a correction or erratum. If it is already ...


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