75

Don't ask them. It's a smack in the face. Advertise the position in the same place you advertised the salaried one; they will see it if they are still looking, and apply if they feel they need to.


72

There are really two parts to the Chair's question: How much additional work have you had to do so far? What additional work do you anticipate going forward? Are there any time savings that should also go into the calculation? What is the appropriate renumeration for that work? You should be able to estimate the answer to (1), and explain where the number ...


60

As much as I like Google Scholar, requiring candidates to create a Google Scholar profile specifically seems inappropriate. You are effectively saying you won't hire people that don't use Google. What you could do is make it an optional part of the application or you could ask candidates to submit something more vague like a "citation report" and suggest ...


46

The adjunct model seems to be predicated on an assumption that most adjunct faculty are presumed to be employed somewhere else. It's supposed to be a win-win: the institution gets a qualified expert with current, out-of-the-ivory-tower experience; the adjunct gets a chance to scratch a teaching itch, or to work with the university. All this happens for a ...


44

Have you considered ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor IDentifier)? I have the same concerns about intellectual property protection issues around Google unfortunately. GoogleScholar is also quite discipline specific (as others have said here) and is banned in some countries (China, etc). So to endorse a product that exposes a scholar to legal ...


38

Can I become a tenure-track prof in one dept (biology) and teach in a different dept (math) with only one PhD? TL;DR: no. Long answer: I was for several years the chair of a mathematics department and during that time oversaw teaching assignments for the 200-odd courses offered yearly by my department. I can recall only one case in which my department ...


36

Ask them. What other option do you have? Not asking them I guess, but then you're making the decision for them. Personally, I can't imagine being offended if you explain it the way you did above. That said, I do agree that most candidates will react the same way other answerers have ("no freaking way!") -- all the more so because they were personally ...


27

Putting in place a better system for evaluating teaching than today's student evaluation forms would be a good start. Getting serious about the assessment of student learning outcomes (rather than simply assigning grades) would also be extremely helpful.


24

All you need to teach undergrad courses at the university level here in the US is a masters, which you have. You can't be tenure track (a professor) without the PhD, but you can be a lecturer. And you can certainly be a part-time adjunct or affiliate. Contact the department chairs in the engineering departments of these local schools. Ask to meet to ...


23

I believe the answer is simply one of supply and demand. As you mentioned in your question, there is an oversupply of those willing to teach. As the old saying goes, those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. While this saying does not represent my feelings I did find it a quite typical American perception toward the teaching profession. Years ago I taught ...


21

What are your research interests within neuroscience? Dan Romnik's answer presupposes that you want to keep the two fields completely separate: you'll run a neuroscience wet lab as your day job and moonlight as a calculus instructor at night. For the reasons he outlines, this would be very difficult indeed, verging on impossible. However, neuroscience is a ...


21

An adjunct is someone without a continuing contract who teaches courses with only a contract for that course (or a few courses). They are "temp" employees and often get only minimal benefits such as contribution to retirement and such (US). Pay is normally abysmal. A professor emeritus may teach or not. It is an honorific often/normally given to ...


18

In addition to other useful comments and answers: in my context, of mathematics... : yes, only a very small fraction of "adjunct" teaching is done because of lack of expertise of "regular faculty". Examples would often be "financial math" or "actuarial math". Far more typically, adjuncts teach very low level math. Now, on one hand, while the mathematics ...


17

First of all, consult a lawyer before doing anything. If you were to leave in the middle of the course, that will cause havoc, that they won't probably want. Since they are not paying you for the work, you are under no contractual obligation to fulfil anything (but consult the lawyer), and can leave without giving them notice. Now, you may find unethical ...


17

Having only one doctorate isn't the problem. But you would find it difficult to find a university that had compatible needs. If you are tenure-track in Biology, that department will want you to do research in Biology (of course), but also to serve the students in that field. If you aren't doing that, you will have problems, and if you ask for such a position,...


16

This is clear cut plagiarism. And not only is it plagiarism, it is also very poorly conducted plagiarism, which is a bit worse in my book, since it indicates that the student does not even takes studying seriously enough to read through the assignments and understand what he/she is plagiarizing. Your university surely has guidelines. If you don't know the ...


16

Actually, I would ignore it. It is fairly typical behavior among some faculty. It might not even be abuse, but just the other person having time to reflect after the meeting. If the comments made were on-topic and not a personal attack, then you have nothing to gain in your current position by doing anything beyond arguing for your position. It could even be ...


16

I do not think it is reasonable to ask candidates to create a profile on any third-party platform. Particularly on a google service, taking in account that some proportion of web users have concerns about this company (as well as other large corporate data processing companies), and do not want to get on their radar if possible. Typically, it is sufficient ...


15

This sucks, but it is the reality of the academic job market. Basically, you want to offer them (hopefully), or ask them to apply (less nice, bordering on rude), the same job but now you are going to pay them less, likely substantially less, with fewer benefits and no long term security. Now, here is the hard part. If you don't offer them the worse job, they ...


15

I think it's generally agreed that it is unwise to tell an employer that you might leave, that nobody does this, and that nobody expects anyone to. You only tell them when you are definitely leaving, which you did as soon as you knew. You haven't done anything inappropriate. Your old department head is surely not thrilled about having to fill your classes ...


14

This is either an abuse of an adjunct (I doubt they are paying you enough for this!) or they're grooming you to bring you properly on board. If it's the latter, or if your interest is coincidentally piqued, I suggest you start with two things: Find a mentor. This person doesn't have to be in your department, and doesn't have to be an expert in the same ...


14

Both of your definitions are too restrictive. Even in the US, the term "adjunct professor" is used in at least two ways. The older meaning was for an extra appointment to a department for someone employed in another department or another institution. This meaning is still in use at some institutions, with "Adjunct Associate Professor" ...


12

If you want to obtain a long-term faculty position, at least in the United States, it is usually better to get a postdoc position rather than an adjunct lecturer position. Perhaps it should not be this way, but the practical fact is that at present adjunct lecturers are often treated as interchangeable exploited labor. Yes, you will build up teaching ...


12

There are at least two sets of people who would prefer the single course assignments to a full time job: People employed in industry who like teaching, and would like some extra money. Retired academics who do not want a full time workload. To reach those people you need an outreach effort that should include advertising to fill your single course jobs. As ...


12

It is common, and reasonable, for employers to require job candidates and employees coming up for review to provide the employer with any information it needs to evaluate the candidates/employees. So certainly you can ask them to prepare readable, well-formatted publication lists, citation information, and anything else that lets you evaluate their impact ...


11

Take however much they were paying you monthly and divide that by the hours you actually work. This gives you an hourly wage. Multiply that by however much you need to turn your courses to an online format, and quote that number.


11

No, almost surely not. Lower-level math courses are imagined to be easily teachable by soooo many people that the market pressure is that there's a vast labor surplus... And, as in other answers, your home department will have definite ideas about your allocation of energies there... And, it would be unwise to promote yourself as a low-end product... who is, ...


10

I am a biology education researcher at a large public university, which means I spend a lot of time reading about teaching techniques and analyzing student outcomes. I teach college biology courses regularly. I say all this to emphasize that teaching well is a difficult skill set in itself. Being an expert in a field is only tangentially related to being an ...


10

The fact that they did not pay you for two pay periods means that they have committed wage theft in most states in the US. You should go to an employment attorney immediately. You almost certainly have an oral or implied contract, and whatever they are saying about you not having one or "rules" requiring one is malarkey. You worked, under terms that they ...


10

This usage of "Associate Faculty" may be fairly unique to the Perimeter Institute. They have a number of faculty with joint appointments at Canadian universities, who typically alternate between semesters with the usual teaching duties at the university and semesters at PI with no responsibilities except for research. There is a list of such faculty here; ...


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