189

On a coauthored paper, it's perfectly reasonable for the acknowledgments to specify who is thanking whom when it's just a subset of the authors, and this is not uncommon (e.g., "X and Y are grateful to the A Institute for hosting their visit" or the like, when author Z wasn't actually there). This is the approach Ritz suggested in the comments, and I'd ...


133

A thesis is not a place to solve grudges. It is a professional document that is eternal. As such, it should be handled professionally and gracefully. Still, I am having trouble why you do not want to have an acknowledgement section. Do you really believe you have done the entire PHD entirely yourself? Even if your advisor did not help enough, you had some ...


133

You can thank whomever you want in the acknowledgments of your thesis, but there may be consequences that you have to live with. In my opinion it is a bad idea to admit to illegal activity in a formal document like this. Once you write that, you cannot unwrite it: it will be archived for the rest of your career. I don't really think you'd get in any ...


106

The acknowledgements section is really yours to do with as you wish. You can thank anybody who has been of help and support to you, no matter how formal or informal your relationship with them is. You can make the relationship explicit or not, however you prefer. Thus, for example, it is equally valid to write: Thank you to Jane Smith, for all her love ...


85

Actually, I think you should relax and take your advisor's advice. Collaboration is a good thing, and it is a two-way street. You give a bit and you get a bit. I assume you got an acknowledgement in the paper for your help. I don't think it would be appropriate if you weren't. But authorship is a different thing. You contributed ideas. Research seminars ...


83

I would refrain from adding this to the written/electronic version of the project report. It's very personal and uses colloquial language that should be avoided in a formal report, even in the acknowledgement section. Having said that, you may still give to that particular teacher a copy with your personal hand-written dedication. Btw, great example of ...


82

When you list someone in the acknowledgments, you're just thanking them, as opposed to speaking on their behalf or assigning them responsibility (the way authorship does), so I don't see why permission should be required. I've never asked for permission or been asked myself, so it's certainly not standard in mathematics. I haven't heard of it in other ...


75

I am planing in taking it to the head of department. Let me assure you that this is a bad idea. 99 times out of 100 the department head will not intervene in these matters. Moreover even if they do (again, super unlikely), and you get things your way with this paper, I assure you that this will forever mar your relationship with your advisor. I would be ...


71

The acknowledgement is not just for the results you get ultimately, but for the time and effort spent by your colleague in discussing your problem. Research is not deterministic, so you can rarely know beforehand what approach will work; you need to try different methods and then see what gives you the results. It's unfair to credit only those which ...


66

I certainly think it could be worded in a more positive and professional way. It comes off a bit salty and as if all your research work was to prove one man wrong. If I were to read your work, I would certainly get a bad initial impression.


65

I see two possible reasons for their behaviour. Others options are possible. They are using your name to reduce the chances of desk-rejection. I have heard that a well-known expert in the acknowledgements can be seen as a positive point for some editors. They copy-paste the acknowledgements of a previous manuscript and forgot to delete you.


65

A possibility which have not been mentioned: If you are in the acknowledgements section, you will not be asked to review a paper. Especially within narrow sub-fields, this can actually mean something.


64

Unless I totally misunderstand what kind of colours we are talking about, your student did what I would consider best practice. Using a consistent colour scheme for all figures in a publication or presentation is a good thing for the following reasons: It is aesthetically pleasing, in particular on posters and presentations. If two plots have colour axis ...


64

I agree with Anonymous Mathematician: There are lots of non-obvious ways to contribute to a paper, and it never hurts to be generous. But if they really did not contribute to the paper, then there is nothing to acknowledge in the paper. If you really feel you owe them thanks for something that isn't a contribution to the paper, just call and thank them.


60

Let's say it was a big enough contribution to require a citation. You could cite the MathOverflow post, as Massimo Ortolano suggests, especially if the entire conversation was generative, and it would be worthwhile for readers to visit. However, linking to a pseudonym is not going to be clear or able to be attributed to that scholar. While William Sealy ...


60

At least in my field, Acknowledgements are generally regarded a fairly informal mechanism. There are few rules dictating what must and mustn't go in there. However, given that mentions in the acknowledgements don't dilute formal credit, I see no reason not to be as generous, gratuitous and grateful as possible in an acknowledgements section. Its not like ...


56

I think you should talk to the group leader about the appropriateness of an acknowledgment for the drawing (not coauthorship). This is the right course of action for any contributor. The fact that she's your wife is not relevant, and should not be a part of this professional conversation. How to approach the group leader depends on how you usually interact. ...


54

Clearly your advisor thinks well of you and thinks you are ready to move to the next level professionally. You both missed the issue at an earlier stage. Had he found it then he might well have pointed you to a fix rather than providing it. He is probably as pleased as you are that a fix was possible. So thank him for support and guidance (perhaps "...


48

If the review itself is not signed, it sounds like the unblinding was not deliberate. I would: Reply as if the review were anonymous Notify the editor in a separate, private message saying there may have been an error in showing the reviewer name


48

In general, I would be pragmatic about this. If the contribution of the Assistant Professor is large enough to warrant co-authorship (which is a different story altogether, and not the question here), it should be large enough to mention their funding source. Presumably they have actually had to invest some amount of time into the manuscript to warrant co-...


46

You can thank him by name for making helpful suggestions for improvement. You don't need to say that the comments were during a formal review. Alternatively, he should be thanked as an anonymous reviewer. I would, personally, prefer the first alternative. The publisher might also prefer it if you are using the name.


43

There's nothing wrong with thanking God or other religious figures, and it's not particularly unusual. It could upset people if you use the acknowledgments as a place to expound religious doctrine, but no reasonable person would take offense at simply thanking God and I've never seen it cause any controversy.


43

The article (i.e. its contents and references) are within your remit as a reviewer. Checking copyright details and investigating any the legal ramifications will not be relevant to the review you should be doing.


42

Those discussions were “fruitful” in the sense that you cleared them off the list of avenues to pursue and were able to spend that time on other avenues. So, yes acknowledge them.


42

You should ask the professor to describe your contribution to the database and the relationship between the database and the publication. No matter what the reason is that you are not an author on the publication, there is no benefit to including the reason in your letter of recommendation. A correction to the author list could benefit you, but only someone ...


41

Not including acknowledgements when it is generally accepted to do so is likely to reflect badly only on you.


41

Don't acknowledge, cite the Mathoverflow post! The following theorem is taken from [1] ... [1] A. User, blah blah, Mathoverflow has also a cite function at the bottom of the posts to retrieve a possible reference in various formats (e.g. BibTeX).


41

I decided to elevate my comment to an answer. When this is all over, and most of your readers will probably know multiple people who died during the crisis, this would not be a good [look]. This is a global crisis that is only just beginning. By the time the dust settles, millions may have died from the virus alone. It would be a rare reader who does not ...


40

On the other hand, it seems really awkward to demand that someone acknowledge me - it seems like a faux pas even to admit that I noticed. Don't be embarrassed to ask to be credited for your work. If you're not willing to stand up for yourself as a professional, others may not do it for you! An acknowledgment is entirely appropriate to recognize your ...


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