63

It is not entirely unreasonable to include a citation in an abstract, if the reason you are citing it is because your paper is a major extension, rebuttal, or counterpoint to the cited article. In that case, however, you do have the responsibility of providing the reference within the body of the abstract. For example, We extend upon the results of ...


62

As an author, you can choose different styles for abstracts. As far as I know, the most interesting and shortest abstract ever was written in this paper, Can apparent superluminal neutrino speeds be explained as a quantum weak measurement? by M V Berry, N Brunner, S Popescu and P Shukla. Abstract Probably not.


53

The real answer is that they don't. I'm sorry, but I can't slice it any other way. You would need all the planets to align in order to receive an answer after such an email. You are asking someone who doesn't know you and who is probably very busy (like all academics) to provide you a big favor for nothing in return. Because let's be honest, giving feedback ...


49

Essentially, you have three challenges that work against you receiving an answer to this mail: You need to avoid your mail to appear like academic spam. Your email draft is rather good in that sense because it is short, nicely written, and free of the usual keywords that trigger people's mental spam filter ("submit your article", "endorse this and that", ...


47

As others said, this is a matter of style of convention and taste. Compare these two abstracts: Does every compact Hausdorff space admit a compatible metric? In this work we show that the answer is positive exactly in the case where the space is second-countable. And We show that a compact Hausdorff space admits a compatible metric if and only if ...


46

Don't write results you don't have. Neither in the present, past or future tense. Just don't do it. Yet, I agree with you that there are circumstances where you do need to write an abstract on on-going work. For example, many big conferences in my field now ask for abstracts to be submitted up to 10 months in advance of the conference itself! If you are a ...


40

"I will never start an abstract with questions, and I will never read this paper if it starts with questions." These are your friend's personal opinions regarding abstracts. If you take a moment to read a cursory sample of published research abstracts, how many of them have a question? Isn't the purpose of research to answer questions? As for your ...


37

A good-looking report will put me in the mindset that you took the assignment seriously, and aimed to turn in quality work. I think that counts for something, not nothing. That said, if a report is just that – good looking, with little substance behind it – I will see through the façade very quickly, and all those superficial niceties might even count ...


32

You submit an abstract to a conference if you would like to give a talk there. The abstract is then used to determine whether or not you get that chance (based on how interesting/relevant/sound the abstract is judged for that particular conference). So for the conference, this lets them filter (a bit) the talks that get presented there, for the author, this ...


22

Whether it's 'allowed' or not, formally speaking, is exclusively the decision of your institution. However, this is your thesis, and within reasonable parameters you can and should do with it what you feel is right. Adding an abstract in your own language is certainly well within the field of reasonable. In particular, it's important to note that many ...


19

You should check the guidelines from your university. I'd assume that they would have requirements for the order. If not, I always prefer the acknowledgements should come first, that way the non-scientific stuff is out of the way.


18

No. It's a deadline. Follow it. Program committees ask for abstracts early to streamline the reviewing process. Asking them to make a special exception for you because you're not ready yet is unfair to the program committee, who would have to do extra work (however small) to accommodate your late submission, and to the hundreds of authors who got their ...


18

Is it normal to submit an abstract to a conference when the research is NOT completed? Sure. There are plenty of fields where the purpose of a conference is to discuss research that is "still cooking." In fact, many journal publications can be viewed as interim reports on larger research programs that are still in progress. You might use this ...


17

Following up the comment - giving a talk is not just a CV line. For most academic researchers, access to funding to attend a conference depends on being a presenter at that conference. So giving a talk is essentially the ticket to hearing what other people are working on, identifying potential collaborators, and keeping up to date. Journal papers are not ...


15

First, I should mention that the "no paper, no podium" (and vice versa) only applies to conferences where proceedings are published. For many conferences, this is not the case—including many conferences in physics, chemistry, engineering, and applied mathematics that I regularly attend. In general, if you have to withdraw a paper because of whatever reason—...


15

Just some strayed thoughts: Be cautious with reviewers who give overly dogmatic "rules of thumb" about writing. A few of those rules are reasonable and legitimate, the majority are either learned practices and unsupported or outdated conventions. To me (hint: opinion), starting a paragraph with a question is cliche. 1) I can understand the use of it in ...


14

A small piece of translation like this should be clearly credited, but is not large enough that I think that it should be considered a significant piece of independent work. As such, I think that a statement in the thesis acknowledgements would be sufficient.


13

The challenge with ever-earlier deadlines for conferences (sometimes six months or more in advance of the actual date!) makes planning for a conference a very difficult prospect. You're left with only a handful of options, none of them particularly appealing: Submit an abstract on incomplete research, and hope that the work is completed in time for the ...


13

In papers themselves, there is absolutely no reason why you should ever copy any previously published text (including yours) without explicit acknowledgment, along the lines of "The background material in this section is a nearly verbatim adaptation of Section 3.2 of X". Assuming you make it perfectly clear what you have copied and from where (not hiding ...


13

You could refer to the German research project by acronym without referring to the full name or you could omit the acronym entirely. The former is perhaps better when the acronym is well known; the latter when it isn't. Since you'll surely be providing the full name, acronym, and translation later, either should be fine. I suggest that a footnote be ...


12

One of the things that is too much overlooked is that an abstract is read by a more diverse crowd of people than the rest of your paper. So, you have three different goals: Give a take-home message to people who aren't interested enough to read the full paper. Convince the undecided to read it. Make it easier for experts to find it. Nowadays, #3 is not so ...


12

Congratulations on presenting a paper in one of the most important conferences of your field. That is certainly something to be proud of, but the correct place to list the achievement would be under a heading such as "Conference talks" or "Presentations" as others suggest. A title and abstract cannot under any reasonable definition be considered a ...


12

One important thing to keep in mind is that the abstract is typically copied to various article databases, which have varying support for markup. As such, much of the formatting will not necessarily be carried over. That nicely formatted bulleted list which appears in the pages of the journal can turn into a confusing mess in online article databases. (e.g. ...


11

If your content is as good as the cover you used, it is ok. But if you are trying to create a good looking report about a badly implemented project, it is just a waste of time and shows that you concentrate on the trivial things rather than on important ones. Those who judge your work won't judge it by its cover, I hope. That said, if the report is about a ...


11

If you are submitting an abstract for a contributed talk or poster at the ICM and your paper is submitted to a math journal, then there is no issue. The mathematics community does not consider the abstract to be a publication and there is no conflict with simultaneous submission of a paper. In fact, this would be common. If you are writing a paper for the ...


11

It's not an uncommon mistake, and if we were to reject all papers and abstracts that have citation mistakes, the publication rate would probably drop to nearly zero. may the abstract still be accepted despite the citation mistake? Yes, sure. To avoid this kind of error in the future, you can try to write your papers with LaTeX, using its bibliographical ...


11

Yes, you should limit yourself because the goal of the abstract is to be short. Now, where to put the limit? A good idea would be to look at recently published articles in this journal and note their length.


10

Ultimately, you and your co-authors are responsible for the contents of your manuscript. You can cite abstracts of works you haven't read in full, in any language, including your native tongue. However, misuse of such abstracts can always be called out by the reviewers of your paper. You will be responsible for defending your choices in the review process, ...


10

You go and present a talk. No paper will be published in the proceedings. If proceedings are published at all for this conference, your abstract will probably be published therein. This is a pretty common conference format in many engineering disciplines. You should take any review feedback, apply it to your article, and find a journal to send it to. If ...


9

I don't know if it's legal (it could depend on what counts as fair use, for example), but I wouldn't be concerned. I don't see any likelihood that this will harm you. It's possible that they asked the journal for permission to reprint the abstract, but I'd guess they just grabbed it from the web. The "journalists obtained a quote" stuff may be intended to ...


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