Hot answers tagged

30

I would not tell anyone anything until you have accepted the position (ideally with a signed contract). Leaving a position on short notice leaves your colleagues in a bind to cover your teaching and leaves your graduate students (and possibly lab personnel) at risk. If you are given an offer, you may be able to negotiate solutions to these problems (or the ...


21

If you think this discovery was big enough for Nature or Science then why didn't you send the article to either of these journals? You can't tell people what to be excited about and if the work is good enough then it will make its own headlines. In the mean time, speaking to your university press officer seems like a good start and they can put something ...


14

It's hard to tell exactly what's happening here. It does not seem unreasonable for collaborators to sync up daily. Ideally all three of you would be syncing up with each other, rather than just this student syncing up with her supervisors -- but since she is only staying for a short time and working on a single project, it is sort of natural that there is ...


12

No, you shouldn't mention securing letters of recommendation in your personal statement. It sounds a little too mercenary, like you are more interested in bureaucratic outcomes like letters than you are in actually learning. It may hurt the feelings of faculty from your home institution who read it, and it's not really what the other institution is looking ...


10

For professors in Japan, taking on students is a tremendous responsibility and burden. Unlike in the United States or Europe, professors are responsible for even the extracurricular activities of students (i.e., getting arrested; showing up drunk and groping someone; having an apartment so messy that the landlord complains, etc.). They are also responsible ...


10

One big advantage of changing schools is that you meet new people. Most people have a few things they're really good at. By meeting new people, you get to learn the new things that they are really good at. More generally, you get to experience the culture of a different place and group of people (both academically and socially). This helps to give you a ...


10

It may depend on who your advisor knows in foreign countries --- or who you can get to know in foreign countries. I've known people who've done this, but my impression is that in grad school it becomes less about "doing a study abroad" and more about doing a "visiting scholar" program at a particular school. That is, you wouldn't seek or find something ...


8

I would like to answer this question by asking one myself: would you go to a three-star Michelin restaurant, with a respectable but established clientele, with posh and smart diners, who do not need to meet their cooks or maitre's but just enjoy the glamour of the settings? Or would you prefer to visit a 1-star, striving to get a second star, where you have ...


8

I've been in more or less the same situation, though with a slightly less strict time constraint. Here is what I've learnt/done: The timing of the move is negotiable. If they really want you, they'll wait 6 months or even a year. 1 1/2 months is completely unrealistic, and they know this. You may be able to have a part time appointment at your original ...


8

The only way you can be certain that you've earned a scholarship is receiving a letter stating "you've earned this scholarship". Anything else is misplaced optimism/hubris/etc and should probably be avoided. It goes without saying that you should definitely not take any actions at this point that are based on the assumption that you earned the scholarship. ...


6

Is this a valid reason to give other departments when inquiring about working with them? Yes, absolutely! By not providing the necessary resources for you to begin on your expected start date, the university has released you from any obligation to attend. You are a free agent. How can I formulate this in a way which is positive? It's not clear that ...


5

From your question, it seems like there is a misunderstanding about the process of studying abroad: If you want to study abroad, you first apply for admission (and possibly scholarships). Only if you are accepted (and you accept the offer), you start your preparations to move to the place of study. There is no need to move before having been accepted. You ...


5

Yes, German universities oftten require an official copy of your high school certification, even if you already have a university diploma which implies the completion of a high school. The same happened to me when I was starting my PhD in Germany - I also was required to present my high school certificate, although I also had two university diplomas (...


5

This answer is mostly for Asia. Yes, there are programs in at least Japan and Korea (that I am aware of) for American Ph.D to find a job, including professorship. I think the largest difference/challenge you will face is that many times, being a student and working in Asian countries such as China, Japan, Korea, is very different. In general, the faculty, ...


5

I would expect that it almost certainly does not hurt your chances. Many people proceed their academic education or career after professional experience. In our Master programme, this is treated as a significant plus, and I would be very surprised if companies wouldn't do the same. But for the non-academic portion of the question (I infer you mean a job ...


5

First and foremost your mental/physical health is the most important thing. I was in your situation as well, and did my studies away from home. Here are my thoughts hope it can help you: Temporary break: It might be the case that you are just exhausted yourself. What about a short break? You could have a honest conversation with your supervisor and take a ...


4

It is very dependant on the country you live in. There are plenty of countries whos universities have special programs for students studying abroad. In such programs, you are often in contact with other people from your university / country who study or live near you when you're in another country. They then organise several events to explore the culture ...


4

Depending on the country you're from, moving to Switzerland for a PhD might be an immediate improvement in your living standards, and that is certainly a good reason. It might also bring you on the spot to take advantage of the stronger hiring prospects in the industry, especially for engineers, mathematicians, biologists. But, from a strictly academic point ...


4

Learning a language is a lot of work, particularly if it is not that similar to languages you already know. So it's not an endeavour to undertake just because you might get a job somewhere later. You need real motivation to learn a language properly. The main reasons I see for an academic to learn a language properly are: because you enjoy learning ...


4

contacted editors from Science and Nature so that they can mention our paper in highlights-like section, We got highlighted in Nature after: having a biomedical publication submitted, and accepted in, one of the specialist journals of the Nature publishing group (NPG), creating a professional media package with the media office of our university (interview, ...


4

Short answer: Yes, it does matter. Slightly longer answer: The GPA is one of the few ways universities can use to assess someone's academic abilities. There are a lot of flaws with the system but there aren't many alternatives. Presenting the courses and grades automatically indicates your (alleged) proficiency in the material. If you think your classes ...


4

You need to fundamentally evaluate why you are doing a PhD and if you think the end goal is worth it. If your only reason to get a PhD is "I wanna live the international student experience", then you have already achieved your goal. As you have discovered, "the international student experience" is often very isolating. It takes at least one year to build a ...


4

To my knowledge, there aren't any laws prohibiting anyone from joining a graduate program for any reason. It might be a problem if there is a conflict in grant funding or with the confidentiality needs of a particular research program, but otherwise it should be fine. He should Just make sure he fulfill any obligations in the programs. It would probably be ...


4

I suggest that you present it as it was awarded, and perhaps list the university as well. Most people will accept it at face value, though you may get the occasional question about what it means. Australia isn't so isolated that it can't accept international terminology. This would be different if you are in a field that requires certain certification, ...


4

The answer to this will vary, depending on location. It might even be so local as to be determined by the local school district, though state level regulations most likely apply. But, I would think that you can make the case that, for some programs, the MA is just as valid, if not more so, than the US "equivalent". Certainly EU degrees are high quality. ...


3

I had a similar situation back when I was a post-doc from America in the Netherlands. All of the science was done in English, all the talk at coffee was in Dutch. After a few months settling in to the work side, I went to my boss and asked for two weeks off to take an immersion course in Dutch at a local Dutch language institute. I followed that up with ...


3

A supplement to @user1938107's excellent answer about Asia. There are some future career issues you need to think about before you come to Asia to work. The first one is tenure. Many Asian countries offer only visiting professorships to western scholars. Those visiting professors do get higher salary than local people. But, most of them are not permanent ...


3

Ignoring the issue with obtaining a license to visit Cuba, I would say the feasibility of a US undergrad being able to study in Cuba is quite low. International study in a third world country is difficult and Cuba presents even more problems for US citizens. US credit and debit cards do not work in Cuba. You cannot wire money to Cuba, and you cannot legally ...


3

You should definitely take into account quality of life in either position. Also, you should keep in mind that in the academic world, it is looked upon favorably to move around for your training.


3

Go. Even if it is going to be harder, smaller pay, etc. Science is about diversity. You need new academic experiences. It will greatly improve both you and your work. Even if it doesn't really work. Further, every time I see a CV that only lists one institution, bs+ms+phd, I think "meh". And I know that doesn't really help in selection processes for ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible