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Results tagged with Search options user 9892

On the evaluation of work (typically, a publication or grant proposal) by the author's peers. This includes: refereeing, which is often used to determine an academic paper's suitability for publication in a journal or conference; peer evaluation of teaching skills; peer review of research grant proposals; and post-publication review of a book or article, as is common in the field of mathematics.

30
votes
6answers
I'm writing a referee report on a paper. This paper is interesting and, if correct, would be worth publishing. However, I believe they have a major mistake in their method which invalidates their res …
asked Oct 7 '16 by AJK
12
votes
I believe that this sort of disclosure can be ethical, especially to a neutral third party, and when only discussing papers that have already been accepted and/or published elsewhere. (Papers still in …
answered Nov 8 '16 by AJK
3
votes
Appealing to "the graduate student left" or other sorts of "moving on" can be successful, but only in response to some referee requests. There are two common types of referee comments: To prove yo …
answered Jan 20 '17 by AJK
9
votes
You should almost certainly not tell them. While I have seen a certain amount of "friendly" post-review disclosure, even if this is accepted in your field, I think the circumstances here strongly weig …
answered Jul 31 '17 by AJK
20
votes
Definitely don't do it. Write to the editor and decline. Often, journals will have some explicit guidelines on who appropriate referees are and what conflict-of-interest rules apply. Even beyond being …
answered Nov 23 '16 by AJK
3
votes
One possible factor: the audience for your referee reports will be wider, which means people with less background may read them. When I write referee reports, it is often from one expert to another -- …
answered Apr 20 '17 by AJK
4
votes
Brian P is entirely correct that this is the sort of service that is valuable to the field, but does not make your CV/resume stand out. Most people view reviewing as a combination of altruism and self …
answered Nov 24 '16 by AJK
28
votes
3answers
When refereeing a paper, I often have objections to the work that do not rise to the level of using the coercive powers of a referee to delay or reject the work. For instance, I find myself wanting to …
asked Jul 5 '17 by AJK
7
votes
Your referees at specialist journals said, basically, "These methods aren't good enough to answer these questions, because X." But the generalist high-impact journal may have looked more at the result …
answered Dec 12 '17 by AJK
8
votes
One perspective is from the Journal of Open Source Software, which explicitly establishes reviewer guidelines that cover these questions (http://joss.theoj.org/about#reviewer_guidelines). A (slightly …
answered Dec 5 '17 by AJK
0
votes
I would argue it could be appropriate to contact this professor. In general, it is great when you can work with the original author to make sure that you both understand the points of agreement, and c …
answered Jul 13 '17 by AJK