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Results tagged with Search options user 9553

On standards or conventions specific to the United States higher education system, which differs in structure and style from the systems in other parts of the world.

0
votes
Go with three strong LORs like everyone else and call it good. No one needs five and seven is ridiculous.
answered Dec 20 '17 by Nicole Hamilton
6
votes
It's completely possible a school might ask for an original letter on paper sent direct to them. It's been identified as a US school but not which one. There are perhaps 600 graduate institutions in …
answered Jan 6 '18 by Nicole Hamilton
1
vote
It sounds like this might be your first time through this, so I think you should get a consultation with an employment or intellectual property attorney to get the legal framework. What you learn you …
answered Jan 8 '18 by Nicole Hamilton
57
votes
Demand is counter-cyclical. During recessions, demand rises as people seek additional training, hoping to prepare for new careers. But US unemployment is currently at only 3.6%. We haven't seen une …
answered Jun 6 by Nicole Hamilton
22
votes
Your choices are to do something or not. It's possible you could pass the problem off to someone else but from the sound of it, there's no one available who knows the student better. Personally, I w …
answered Dec 17 '17 by Nicole Hamilton
10
votes
There's nothing to stop you from submitting a LOR written by your former student but it's very difficult to see how such a letter could help you (in either business or academia). If you can't get som …
answered Sep 8 '16 by Nicole Hamilton
3
votes
Use an inside address and a subject line, then dive into your letter. You can skip the salutation in letters to committees. Recruiting Committee University of Whatever City, State Zip Requ …
answered Jan 13 '18 by Nicole Hamilton
3
votes
Don't say anything to them yourself. You don't own the lab. Discuss your concern with your adviser and let it be their problem. If your adviser decides it's okay, try to live with it.
answered Jan 11 '18 by Nicole Hamilton
4
votes
I could be misreading this but it sounds like he means that to get in, someone actually has to want you. I think he's saying it's unlikely you would be admitted to some sort of incoming class of new …
answered Sep 13 '16 by Nicole Hamilton
4
votes
Crucially missing: Out of how many class meetings, how many times has this happened and what exactly did your instructor offer as the reasons at the time? Is it possible he actually does have a good …
answered Sep 9 '16 by Nicole Hamilton
8
votes
Whether you get special consideration probably depends on how special you are. Lynn Conway joined the University of Michigan as a full professor of EE and CS in 1985 with only an MSEE. But she had so …
answered Jun 9 '14 by Nicole Hamilton
4
votes
1answer
As faculty, I've had to report academic misconduct (usually plagiarism) many times but that doesn't mean I know everything about how it works. My understanding has always been that the only people wh …
asked Sep 8 '17 by Nicole Hamilton
8
votes
No, generally speaking, tenure is not offered to teaching faculty, usually called lecturers, or research scientists at American universities. The AAUP has long argued that teaching faculty should als …
answered Jun 15 by Nicole Hamilton
24
votes
All you need to teach undergrad courses at the university level here in the US is a masters, which you have. You can't be tenure track (a professor) without the PhD, but you can be a lecturer. And y …
answered Jul 8 '18 by Nicole Hamilton