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Results tagged with Search options user 938

On making a decision based on morals or common ethical codes instead of etiquette, rules, institutional or government policy, or technical or procedural reasons.

10
votes
The situation you describe in your last paragraph does not sound like business as usual at all: on the contrary, it sounds so bizarre that I am having trouble picturing it taking place. (This is at a …
answered Dec 24 '14 by Pete L. Clark
7
votes
I am not aware of any reputable university (in North America or in other parts of the world with broadly similar cultural mores) in which there are any rules against romantic relationships between fac …
answered Jun 5 '17 by Pete L. Clark
80
votes
No, it's generally not a bad practice. For a closely related question, see How does it affect the treatment of a mathematician's results, if that mathematician was a Nazi?. Should individuals pub …
answered Mar 16 '17 by Pete L. Clark
38
votes
Let me congratulate you for seeing a publication practice that you suspect is fishy and taking the trouble to inquire about it. This is something that contemporary academia really needs: we are self- …
answered May 3 '14 by Pete L. Clark
9
votes
I see no ethical quandary whatsoever in revealing your own negative experience / suspicions of systemic problems within an academic department. It would be easier to argue that some ethical obligatio …
answered Aug 16 '16 by Pete L. Clark
11
votes
According your question, the fact that she doesn't want to make the revisions is also a factor for wanting to look elsewhere: otherwise, why wouldn't she make the revisions and resubmit elsewhere? Yo …
answered Jan 28 '17 by Pete L. Clark
26
votes
Given that the student Honor Council has already found you guilty of cheating, maintaining that what you did was simply out of curiosity does not seem like a good strategy. I don't find that explanat …
answered Nov 25 '14 by Pete L. Clark
6
votes
constitutes plagiarism and is a serious violation of professional ethics. Plagiarism may occur for any type of work, whether written or oral and whether published or not. The correct …
answered May 13 '14 by Pete L. Clark
220
votes
The other answers don't seem to be taking into account that the OP is a 13-year-old junior high school student whose work was presented in a school science fair. I think that treating the OP as a "ve …
answered Dec 21 '16 by Pete L. Clark
9
votes
If I understand you correctly, what you want to publish doesn't "go against" the previous work. It's fully consistent with it, but what is being added is what are often called negative results: namel …
answered Jun 7 '14 by Pete L. Clark
3
votes
If I understand the OP correctly, he does not yet have a master's degree so could enroll in a master's program and then transfer to a different PhD program. That is absolutely, wholly kosher, and in …
answered Feb 14 '15 by Pete L. Clark
21
votes
I think the answer is yes, but you should aim higher: the line you're drawing in the sand is uncomfortably close to you and that's causing more work for you than is necessary. Namely, trying to put t …
answered Dec 21 '14 by Pete L. Clark
10
votes
I want first of all to follow up on a comment made by @Nelson. You speak of an obsession and an obsessive need to behave ethically in all your student endeavors. Could this actually be an obsession, …
answered Sep 24 '17 by Pete L. Clark
112
votes
It seems to me that there is some amount of "having your cake and eating it too" in your question. First of all, I think private mathematical correspondence, including sending preprints, should only …
answered Feb 21 '18 by Pete L. Clark
13
votes
3answers
One of the hot-button issues on this site is standards for coauthorship, especially variants of the question "Must I automatically include my thesis advisor as a coauthor on all my papers?" Since th …
asked May 13 '14 by Pete L. Clark

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