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On earning a second degree at the same level as a degree you already hold (i.e. a second bachelors, second masters, or second PhD).

316
votes
I suspect that most people who ask about the possibility of doing multiple PhDs are missing something fundamental in what a PhD is and what it's for. This is an understandable misperception because t …
answered Feb 21 '14 by Pete L. Clark
4
votes
In the parts of academia I'm most familiar with (mathematics, US), even one master's degree is not a necessary prerequisite for a PhD program. Some students do improve their application and chances b …
answered Mar 28 '16 by Pete L. Clark
9
votes
Can I somehow revoke or renounce my degree? No, and no. By which I mean: 1) There is no honorable way to formally divest yourself of an academic degree. The only way that academic degree …
answered Feb 19 '16 by Pete L. Clark
1
vote
As others have pointed out, the answer to your literal question Is an engineering PhD enough to publish math stats research? is Yes. In fact no degrees are necessary to publish math/stats r …
answered Sep 18 '16 by Pete L. Clark
14
votes
Maybe you do not know what an undergraduate degree at an American university means. You do not study, say, philosophy, you "major" in it. Depending on the university and your own choices, you may ta …
answered Jul 19 '15 by Pete L. Clark
7
votes
I think it will be very difficult -- perhaps prohibitively difficult -- to get a PhD in mathematics (or mathematical physics, which is all but mathematics) in the US given that you already have a PhD …
answered Feb 4 '15 by Pete L. Clark