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On standards or conventions specific to mathematics as an academic discipline, and programs that lead to a degree in this field.

4
votes
I suspect I have similar issues as you: when others talk about complicated subjects, I find they're speaking in English, but they're also not speaking in English (because I don't understand them). I' …
answered Mar 7 by Allure
31
votes
Seems to me that there's a missing word, and the correct comment might be something more like: The considered problem in this manuscript is a practice in high school mathematics and can not be a …
answered Mar 16 by Allure
0
votes
Indeed.com searching for jobs in the US. I refine by jobs requiring a PhD in mathematics (it is very unlikely the specific subfield of mathematics your PhD is in matters). As of time of writing the top …
answered May 16 '18 by Allure
7
votes
Virtually every author is happy if others are reading their papers in detail. Neither is the editor going to object - highly detailed reviews are great from their perspective too. So you won't be goin …
answered May 22 by Allure
3
votes
funding mathematics research (e.g. the NSA if you're in the US). You tell them what you intend to do, how you intend to do it, how much money you'll need, etc. If they approve of your proposal then they send you money to do the research. …
answered Jul 8 by Allure
1
vote
Talk to your professor, fellow students, tutors. The department almost surely has resources to help students learn, and it's up to you to use them. As long as you make a genuine attempt to learn the m …
answered Sep 18 '18 by Allure
0
votes
If you look at your local jobs portal for positions that require a PhD in mathematics, you'll find if there are opportunities for people like you. Here is an example. Yes you have a chance - if they … weren't looking for people with PhD in mathematics, they wouldn't list that as a requirement. Besides, there're more graduates than there are academic positions, so most of those graduates end up in industry. Good luck, and be sure to visit your university's career center if they have one. …
answered Jul 24 '18 by Allure
5
votes
Variants of this question have been asked many times. No, you do not need to have an academic position or be enrolled in a university to publish in journals. You can prevent plagiarism (or at least …
answered Aug 26 '18 by Allure
18
votes
You don't know what the timeline really was like. For all you know, it could've been this: Authors submit paper: 24 January 2002 First decision made: 24 February 2002 Revision submitted: …
answered Jan 6 by Allure
24
votes
The answer-fragment OP quoted is incorrect. Making a mistake while reviewing is not likely to lead to the end of your reviewing career. This comes from several angles (we neglect the possibility that …
answered Jun 6 by Allure
5
votes
Let's take the null hypothesis that this is ethically fine, and then examine reasons why the hypothesis might be wrong. You raise two: Because of the power imbalance, it seems as though the author …
answered Jun 12 by Allure
6
votes
Chances are your plan is fine. You created the piece of work, and you weren't funded, so there's nobody else that can claim that as his or her intellectual property. Still, I would suggest working wit …
answered Sep 14 '18 by Allure
18
votes
It's decently common. I Googled for "peer review failure editor resign" and some examples are: 1, 2, 3, 4. You ask "Why would editors choose to publish [the paper] nevertheless?" There're many possib …
answered Dec 26 '17 by Allure
5
votes
Remember, the admissions committee aren't a charity organization. They'll only accept you if they think you're adequate enough to attend the program. And if they think you're adequate enough, you shou …
answered Jan 2 by Allure
5
votes
The problem is that faculty members explicitly told me they wouldn't supervise students unless they pass the quals. That means I have to waste another year because of the exams. I am concerning tha …
answered May 20 by Allure

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