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Questions on using e-mail for communicating literature and collaborating with peers. Also related to academic advertising or announcements.

1
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I explained the circumstances and requested an extension (well in advance) but never got a response. After a couple days passed, I tried again to no avail. Most professors will work with you if …
answered Dec 14 '18 by cag51
162
votes
What a jerk! No, writing "Prof." is perfectly fine; his reaction is both incorrect and completely inappropriate. I cannot imagine any professor I know (even the ones I don't like) writing such a thing …
answered Mar 28 by cag51
18
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In the US, it's perfectly fine to say "Hello (or dear) Professor X and Professor Y", or something like Dear Professors. Another widely-applicable option is to avoid names altogether -- my favorite is …
answered Aug 23 '18 by cag51
2
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Just e-mail them. The template that guest provides is a good one. Some other notes: Professors probably won't remember that you were a "hermit." Thinking about the time I was instructor of record …
answered Jan 20 by cag51
1
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To me it depends on how well I know you. If I know you very well, then we are probably exchanging e-mails frequently. In this case, the continuous streams of gratitude are a distraction and may even …
answered Nov 12 '17 by cag51
3
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As others have said, keep it short and straightforward. Like this: Dear Professor, Thanks for all the info, I really appreciate it. Unfortunately, this list of courses is far longer than I e …
answered Sep 8 by cag51
28
votes
I would certainly talk to him. It's maybe not necessary to rehash what was said in the exam, that could be awkward. But it's worth asking for an appointment to discuss your research interests and pote …
answered Jun 12 by cag51
0
votes
As you say, there are two possible outcomes, roughly equally likely: They are interested but busy. It's easy to write a mail saying "please send me more", it's a lot more work to read what you sent, …
answered Mar 21 '18 by cag51
1
vote
This does seem strange; I'd be concerned about a mistake (though I'm not familiar with the European system). I'd send a concise note like this: I'm looking forward to this trip. Could I ask about …
answered Mar 9 by cag51
15
votes
All you can conclude from this is that this professor does not give reasonable responses to e-mail. How to proceed: not by e-mail. If it is feasible to visit him in person, that is ideal. If not, yo …
answered Sep 10 by cag51
3
votes
(I don't know anything about business school, nor much about academia outside of the US) Three reactions: Professors never have enough time. I seriously doubt they would be eager to read a long, un …
answered Mar 24 '18 by cag51
8
votes
Your letter seems perfectly polite. My one critique is that I'm not clear what you're asking for. Just to get your record updated? A larger assignment going forward? More money for the hours you put i …
answered Jan 1 by cag51