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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 73

This tag refers to application process for an academic course or an academic employment.

5
votes
note, though, that if you're applying to be a PhD, it's expected that you'll be doing research in the new field, and you'll have to demonstrate to the application committee that you're up to the task … . You may have to be creative about this, given that your background is very different from what they're used to seeing; consider emphasizing any possible applications of computer science to literature (ngrams, maybe?) or anything else which may strengthen your application. …
answered Jan 16 '13 by eykanal
6
votes
This sort of thing should be explained in the cover letter. This trend is pretty common; freshmen enter college ready to party, realize halfway through that their grades are actually important, and th …
answered Jul 17 '13 by eykanal
3
votes
If your work at the prestigious company involved a demonstration of your intellectual and/or research prowess, then yes, it'll probably help. If your work was mostly grunt work, then it's unlikely to …
answered Sep 11 '12 by eykanal
7
votes
Unfortunately, your transcripts are likely going to be required at time of application to any other program, and you can assume that you will be asked about your poor grades during the application
answered May 1 '14 by eykanal
13
votes
As a general rule of thumb, if the position you are applying for (1) has the term "researcher" or something similar in the position title and (2) requires a PhD (or research masters), definitely send …
answered Jun 13 '12 by eykanal
16
votes
You listed it in your question, but just to state it as an answer, you will always want to look into any professor before joining their lab. This includes: Looking up their publications and becoming …
answered Feb 16 '12 by eykanal
14
votes
In your case, I would find scientific publications aimed at the student/general population in your field, and read the articles written for the public. Both Science and Nature will have numerous arti …
answered Feb 16 '12 by eykanal
15
votes
From my experience, most researchers who choose to make money do so in one of two ways: Entrepreneurship. Take whatever you've found with your research and start a business somehow marketing it. Thi …
answered May 29 '12 by eykanal
55
votes
The secret to getting a good letter from someone is making sure they're going to write you a good letter before you have them write one. You should never need to look at a letter someone wrote for you …
answered Apr 17 '12 by eykanal
22
votes
@Davidmh's advice is spot on, but I will definitely add that now is time to review your backup plan. (Of COURSE you have a backup plan, right?) There's always the possibility that you won't get into a …
answered Mar 30 '16 by eykanal
4
votes
From my experience, this means that he would be happy to speak to you after you've been accepted to the program. It's a polite way of saying, "Come back to me after you've been offered—and have accept …
answered Dec 10 '18 by eykanal
1
vote
Note: I am not in the field of Mathematics. The below reflects how I would address this based on my experience elsewhere. It sounds like you have a very clear answer to both of these. What is y …
answered Aug 22 '16 by eykanal