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Results tagged with Search options user 725

Questions related to academic publications including online and traditional journals, books, and conference proceedings.

-1
votes
a central server here, where raw data and source and possibly intermediate results are stored together with the final version of the publications. The size of such a package can easily be of a size …
answered May 13 '13 by cbeleites
17
votes
It is a lot of work to find out which paper in arXiv has actually the same content as a published paper. However, taking arXiv's journal-ref field as a surrogate indicating which paper has a journal v …
answered Aug 22 '13 by cbeleites
4
votes
Cite it. It's a source you used, so you need to cite. In addition, good explanations are also good for readers who are looking for an introduction. didn't go through the usual peer review proc …
answered Oct 14 by cbeleites
6
votes
Stephan Kolassa's answer is sound general advice. However, let me add two more points: For papers with multiple authors I like a contributions section where each author lists their contributions to …
answered Dec 22 '16 by cbeleites
15
votes
In addition to Dave Clarke's answer: I get quite a lot of "invitations" from scam journals, which I ignore. Most of the conferences I attend now publish their "proceedings" as a special issue of on …
answered Jun 21 '12 by cbeleites
5
votes
JeffE commented: It's obvious that it should happen at least 5% of the time, but my impression is that it happens a LOT more often than that. The 5% aren't all that obvious to me: if I understo …
answered Mar 20 '13 by cbeleites
43
votes
authorship of scientific publications. Forty per cent of the respondents (35/87), for example, agreed that granting authorship to someone who does not meet journal authorship criteria was a common …
answered Feb 10 '14 by cbeleites
10
votes
Of course this depends a lot on what you're after. If you are looking for differences or some other effect within an individual, then your sample size are measurements within the individual rather tha …
answered Jul 8 '18 by cbeleites
0
votes
This leads to poor communication between the authors that stay and the person that left, usually motivated by the latter not replying (perhaps reading) emails concerning the work or taking too long …
answered Oct 22 '14 by cbeleites
12
votes
In addition to Marc Claesen's answer: There exist a few journals that require the code to be submitted and where the review explicitly included that code, e.g. the Journal of Statistical Software In …
answered Mar 14 '14 by cbeleites
4
votes
As F'x already said, from a scientific perspective there is no problem. The data is available, just not automatically and from you, but from the original source (via the ID numbers). So editor, revie …
answered Sep 16 '13 by cbeleites
8
votes
So far, I'm missing the option of giving the 110% version of set notation plus explanation in plain English. That way, readers familiar with the set notation can skip the written explanation, and othe …
answered Apr 21 '14 by cbeleites
2
votes
Some countries have library networks with a common catalogue that you can search to find out which libraries have it. This is what your favorite librarian uses to get the paper for you. However, it co …
answered Feb 6 '13 by cbeleites
11
votes
I'm usually all in favor of contribution sections (I've been at the border between medical and natural sciences for a long time, and I've met this custom in medical papers). However, for the present s …
answered Dec 18 '18 by cbeleites
4
votes
 can I put up my scientific findings on my blog or webspace that is not written exactly like my published article but contains essentially the same data and results? This is completely OK with th …
answered Dec 22 '14 by cbeleites

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