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The one who helps students to select courses or an academic major, engages in a short term and long term educational planning, assists in preparing the thesis necessary to obtain the degree; or a person who advises internship students on training in industry.

11
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My advisor was rather driven. I suppose if he hadn't been, he wouldn't have accomplished nearly as much as he did. There were times when he was ready to open up, and times when he wasn't. Once …
answered Mar 30 '17 by aparente001
0
votes
He sounds like a pain-in-the-behind advisor. But you said you don't want to change advisors. Can you find someone else to mentor you, somewhat informally? Should i just do as it is or do i need … optimistic and grateful. Ask if you may come back in a couple of months to check in on how things are going. That may be enough for the administrator to have a helpful conversation with your advisor. …
answered Sep 8 '16 by aparente001
2
votes
(comment converted to answer) No, this is not common in general. See if you can find out the secret of his success in getting the funding (grant money). Then write a grant proposal, with a different …
answered Sep 15 '16 by aparente001
14
votes
Professors are not always the people who would win a prize at interpersonal relationships. Professors often have significant stressors in their lives. So please don't assume this is about you. For …
answered Jun 3 '18 by aparente001
0
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have a student with a hidden disability. Wouldn't you want to know about it, and understand how you can be supportive? Tell your advisor. …
answered Sep 1 '15 by aparente001
3
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This fits in the standard mold, I think, of "How do I assert myself with my advisor?" You wrote one assertive email. At this point you can choose between a more strongly worded (but still polite …
answered Mar 14 '17 by aparente001
2
votes
I don't understand why this sentence has the word "but": Once in a while X is talking to me through skype but now X seems to be mainly interested in authorship of the work we have done together an …
answered May 18 '18 by aparente001
2
votes
Your supervisor's slow response rate is clearly holding you back. It's time to talk to your department administration about the problem. When you do so, please state the problem in neutral terms. E …
answered Nov 26 '15 by aparente001
0
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someone close to you dies, and also that a certain number of weeks of vacation per year are perfectly reasonable, as long as you work out the when with your advisor. (But there is no need to get … permission to take a week off when someone close to you dies.) Once you know where you and your advisor stand with regard to rules, expectations, and unwritten customs, at your university (i.e. once you …
answered Jan 16 '18 by aparente001
5
votes
Your advisor may be under a great deal of stress too -- so you may want to take that into account. You could: Decide you've gone far enough with your studies (for now, at least), and withdraw from … the program, giving yourself a pat on the back for the hard work you've put in so far. Apply and transfer to the other university. Many people do this when their advisor goes somewhere else. Remain …
answered May 16 '17 by aparente001
2
votes
When we work on a big project that requires precise thinking and language, it's easy to get into a mindset of wanting the same kind of precision from the people around us. But sometimes people with s …
answered Feb 18 '18 by aparente001
4
votes
-- ask if you may follow up with an email for some advising. Make an appointment to speak with an advisor. Note, in all of the above, just be yourself. You need not blow a bugle announcing your age …
answered Jun 14 '15 by aparente001
4
votes
either had to re-sit your exams, or apply for special permission. Bottom line: in theory, telling a potential advisor about a disorder like this shouldn't have any negative effects (ethically or legally …
answered Apr 5 '15 by aparente001
4
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There are two basic problems here. The interviewing process is too time-consuming. You are being given a responsibility without the corresponding authority, i.e. the grunt work is being delegated to …
answered May 16 '17 by aparente001
0
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It sounds as though your advisor is not functioning very well, at least not right now, so I do not recommend anything remotely like a confrontation. That could destabilize him further. I understood …
answered Oct 27 '16 by aparente001

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