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Questions related to academic publications including online and traditional journals, books, and conference proceedings.

8
votes
When you are really not affiliated to the institution anymore, you should not put it on your publications. Certainly not, when the work you are publishing has not been initiated during your stay at … , etc), but do not receive any monetary compensation. If you agree to such an arrangement with your previous institution, you obviously can still use the affiliation on your publications. …
answered Mar 30 '17 by Danny Ruijters
6
votes
Adding to the other fine answers: It costs a considerable amount of money to file a patent. Patents are written using very specific idiom and formulations. There are commercial bureaus that rewrite …
answered Jun 10 '15 by Danny Ruijters
5
votes
Is it necessary to always include experimental validation for a numerical model? Typically, yes, this is necessary. When you are going to publish an altered model (e.g., a more complex one), you …
answered Aug 13 '16 by Danny Ruijters
7
votes
Things might vary across fields, but I think that you might be overestimating the impact of being the corresponding author. In my experience the corresponding author handles the communication with th …
answered Jun 20 '15 by Danny Ruijters
1
vote
I would not deduce anything from this. Most likely the system changes the date whenever the editor accesses the article (or the editor does not use the system in the way it was intended). Also it hap …
answered Aug 17 '16 by Danny Ruijters
1
vote
You can certainly give information about an unpublished paper in your CV, including a synopsis. Do mention, however, that the paper is currently under review (that will also explain why a reader of yo …
answered Oct 25 '17 by Danny Ruijters
8
votes
Some journals have in their copyright transfer some text regarding when the article becomes open access. When that is not the case, I would expect that copyright laws apply, and the articles might be …
answered Apr 5 '16 by Danny Ruijters
7
votes
Things vary a bit, depending on the field you are in. Some fields only review and publish abstracts (e.g., medicine), in some fields conferences are more important than journal publications (e.g …
answered Feb 2 '15 by Danny Ruijters
12
votes
Adding to the perfectly fine answers that already have been given: The authors of the respective paper could honestly not be aware of your previous work. You could send them an email saying something …
answered Jul 22 '15 by Danny Ruijters
150
votes
Once upon a time, before the internet existed, the only way to distribute scientific content to a worldwide audience was through print. There are obvious costs related to printed publications such as …
answered Nov 26 '16 by Danny Ruijters
25
votes
For the first question: When the chapter is really just your paper (reformatted), I would go with what you already suggested; begin the chapter with a small text saying "The content of this chapter ha …
answered Jul 27 '15 by Danny Ruijters
4
votes
The same TA pointed out flaws (of fundamental nature, for example F = mv instead of F = ma) in the model, and once corrected allowed me to obtain the results shown in the paper. The fact that aft …
answered Nov 7 '17 by Danny Ruijters
3
votes
publications that might be otherwise less accessible (ArXix) or fast outlets for ongoing research (KIT). It is less common to directly cite ArXiv or KIT working papers, when there are equivalent journal …
answered Jun 14 '15 by Danny Ruijters
5
votes
If you consider it an important part of your portfolio (which is perfectly possible), then: sure, you should list it. You might want to indicate that it was only an abstract + oral talk. When you hav …
answered Sep 9 '15 by Danny Ruijters
22
votes
5answers
Suppose there is data that you as an author of a journal article wants to share with the readership of the article (e.g. raw experimental data, code, gold standard / ground truth data). What would be …
asked Feb 27 '17 by Danny Ruijters

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