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Results tagged with Search options user 14133

On making a decision based on morals or common ethical codes instead of etiquette, rules, institutional or government policy, or technical or procedural reasons.

4
votes
That is a highly specific restriction, I'm not going to discuss whether or not it is legal and to what extent, but take it as it is. It clearly states the extent of your use of the readings, so after …
answered Sep 17 '15 by user3209815
22
votes
8answers
Let me say beforehand that this question does not refer to scientific correctness and treats it as undisputed, i.e. the paper is assumed correct in the sense that it clearly states a valid purpose, ha …
asked Jul 27 '18 by user3209815
1
vote
1answer
The situation concerns ephemeral facts, that can't be proven to an department outsider. The sole two authors of an accepted paper have virtually no contribution to the result, but both hold prominent …
asked Jan 4 '18 by user3209815
2
votes
I don't see how you could take legal action, the content of the letter is confidential. In my institution at least, there would be no way for you to ever see it. So, effectively, you would be taking " …
answered Nov 10 '15 by user3209815
20
votes
I assume that someone's PhD thesis is a larger piece of work than a section of your report. Therefore, I don't see how you can avoid summarizing the thesis to fit your work. And while you are at it, y …
answered Jun 16 '15 by user3209815
0
votes
about ethics, while the initial motive to catch someone red handed is in my opinion ethical, the result in case of failure is unethical (or "more unethical"). If you fail, you did the homework on …
answered Feb 4 by user3209815
5
votes
Do you have access to the exam in question? If you can "legally", e.g. download it from the subject's site, obtain it, then I see no reason why this would be wrong. On the other hand, you could have p …
answered Sep 1 '14 by user3209815
1
vote
ethics, this falls arguably into a gray zone, where it is understood that it is not ethical, yet it is tolerated, as long as the stretch isn't blatant. …
answered Apr 12 by user3209815
18
votes
4answers
A few weeks after my work was published in a conference, I received an email from a research group from another university asking me to provide my source code. The email was very polite and explained …
asked Jul 17 '14 by user3209815
8
votes
At my uni, almost every assignment has to be orally defended in front of the T.A. after it was submitted. This defense proves that the student understood the assignment and has acquired the necessary …
answered May 13 '14 by user3209815
62
votes
I don't think that this is special to any type of professional environment. The professor is polite and responsive. However, they repeatedly tactfully refused an informal meeting, which indicates that …
answered Aug 22 '17 by user3209815
1
vote
One other option is to go public (as jakebeal mentions in his answer to your previous question). I would suggest a step in between in which you would send another email to the editor stating that you …
answered Jun 14 '16 by user3209815
0
votes
I must say that this seems like a somewhat conflicted situation. The professor doesn't consider the syllabus of the course weighted enough, so he emphasizes the project and charges a student with a ad …
answered Mar 25 '15 by user3209815
5
votes
I often get asked, "Why am I taking this course?" There are some courses that are required regardless of major. Similar questions could be asked of mathematics faculty. However, it turns out that …
answered Jan 17 '18 by user3209815
0
votes
Well, like everyone he is free to post on the internet anything he wants that is considered legal. Wrong answers are legal from that perspective. Regardless what he intends to teach/enforce his stude …
answered May 7 '15 by user3209815

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