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Results tagged with Search options user 10685

The customary code of polite behavior amongst the academic world.

12
votes
To be honest, the specific example you give is unlikely to be helpful, since you're in something like a linguistics class and your analogy requires an understanding of a completely different field, ob …
answered Oct 28 '14 by David Richerby
61
votes
No, do not do this. It is a complete waste of everybody's time. Office hours are there to help students learn, not for playing pranks. If there are other students who wish to use office hours to lear …
answered Sep 2 '17 by David Richerby
11
votes
Academics get this kind of question all the time. No response means "Sorry, I'm not interested. I have enough on my plate looking after my own students at my own university, without taking on somebody …
answered Feb 27 '18 by David Richerby
39
votes
Is it acceptable for me to email the writer of the paper, and ask for explanations of basic concepts in the paper? Not really, no. When somebody writes a paper about something, they're not offeri …
answered Jun 14 '18 by David Richerby
41
votes
Ask him. It sounds like none of the errors is serious so if your question is just one of etiquette, all you need to say is that you think you found a few typos and little mistakes in the paper and …
answered Jan 6 '15 by David Richerby
39
votes
Use a search engine to see if there's a free copy online – many authors put their papers on their own websites and, in some fields, on ArXiv or other repositories. Ask your university's library if th …
answered May 26 '14 by David Richerby
8
votes
If the senior people are drinking too, there's no question that it's appropriate for you to. If you're at an event where drinks are provided, but the senior people aren't drinking then it should be fi …
answered Jun 16 '14 by David Richerby
3
votes
If the email is from somebody who you'll need to communicate with in the future, you can let them know that you don't have a PhD. It doesn't matter how you do that: just be polite. Most of these email …
answered Sep 22 '16 by David Richerby
3
votes
In 15 years in academia (theoretical computer science, UK and Greece, plus conferences and workshops in several different countries in Europe and North America), the closest I've come to a business ca …
answered Jun 29 '14 by David Richerby
21
votes
I have never come across somebody who seemed to be using difficult expressions just to confuse a non-native speaker. When people talk to you in complicated English, it's because they haven't realised …
answered Aug 22 '15 by David Richerby
2
votes
You're over-thinking this. You're not completely sure if you should include the joke but leaving it out doesn't hurt you at all. So just leave it out. You're wasting your time turning this triviality …
answered Oct 17 '15 by David Richerby
11
votes
A thank-you card would be perfect, or even just saying thank you. There isn't a strong culture of giving thank-you gifts in the UK so your professor won't expect one and certainly won't feel that you …
answered Oct 8 '14 by David Richerby
18
votes
You're over-thinking this. Tell the second interviewer what you just told us: you've already accepted a job at the other institution because being closer to your family and so on made you prefer to be …
answered Nov 8 '16 by David Richerby
10
votes
If all her other grad students use her first name, you can too. It would be a very strange person who let some of her grad students use her first name and insisted on others using Dr Surname.
answered Aug 28 '14 by David Richerby
20
votes
You're overthinking this. It's almost always appropriate to thank somebody if you appreciate the work they've done. In this case, where the professor has made a specific effort to help you personally …
answered Apr 20 '18 by David Richerby

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