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On the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) test, a standardized exam that is required for admissions to many graduate schools in the United States.

7
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Copying my comment: I don't think you should. I can't recall ever seeing test scores listed on a CV. Nobody really cares about GRE scores except graduate admissions committees, and they get the scores straight from ETS anyway. …
answered Nov 24 '14 by Nate Eldredge
3
votes
At this level of generality, I think all one can say is the following: Look for programs that do not have a GRE as part of their admission requirements. For departments that do require it: if you … have some specific reason for being unable to take the GRE, or for not having scores that meet their criteria, contact someone at the department and ask how to proceed. (Admissions information …
answered May 9 '15 by Nate Eldredge
9
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The mathematics subject GRE covers roughly the first half of the content that one would learn in a good undergraduate math program. Much of it (calculus, linear algebra, differential equations) is … material that an engineering student would likely be familiar with already. I think that the only good reason to study for the GRE is if you need to take the GRE, i.e. if you want to apply to a school …
answered Aug 28 '14 by Nate Eldredge