Linked Questions

10
votes
5answers
2k views

Why do professors take on service duties? [duplicate]

Why do professors take on service duties, such as reviewing papers for a journal, or sitting on university committees? What benefit does this have to their careers? I can't imagine they enjoy ...
1
vote
3answers
242 views

What are the benefits of serving as a reviewer, initially as a PhD/PostDoc and later as a faculty member/research scientist? [duplicate]

The very first thought that comes to mind is that reviewing a paper is like giving back to the academic community. After all, one's own work is published after the efforts of some anonymous reviewer. ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Why do scientists referee papers (what's in it for them)? [duplicate]

I guess this has different answers in different fields of science, but I'm still interested in some good arguments as to why senior scientists would bother reviewing papers. I understand that it is ...
77
votes
12answers
9k views

Why don't researchers request payment for refereeing?

One of the most criticized aspects of the current publishing scheme, is that academics do pretty much all the work for free and publishers get the money. Why don't people just charge a fee when ...
74
votes
5answers
49k views

Do you list journals you have reviewed for on your CV?

Is it acceptable to list the journals you have reviewed papers for on your CV? Is it common? Do you think it’s recommended? On the one hand, it shows that you are engaged in this necessary part of ...
43
votes
6answers
3k views

As a Ph.D. student, should I spend time reviewing papers?

I am a PhD student halfway through my journey. After I published a few papers, I am getting review requests from some medium rank conference and journal editors. While certainly it is an honour for me,...
26
votes
6answers
4k views

Why do research faculty pursue administrative positions, such as dean, provost, president, etc. ? Do such positions spell the end of one's research?

At a recent seminar talk, I was amazed to note that one of the two coauthors (not the presenter) was the president of a large and well-known university, since I had always assumed that taking on such ...
22
votes
6answers
6k views

What are the benefits of organizing a conference?

Organizing a conference is very difficult for a scientist, you have to have the right collaborators, to find the right venue, to spread the word, to advertise it, to send the call for papers, to ...
15
votes
6answers
5k views

What incentives do professors have to serve on dissertation committees?

It seems that there is no requirement for professors to serve on even a single dissertation committee. (This is so at least at my US university and I believe is common practice worldwide - please ...
12
votes
4answers
2k views

What are the profit margins of academic publishers?

With an eye to finding the reasons behind high journal subscription costs: do journals / publishers make outrageous margins, or are prices truly justified by the costs to run journals? In other words, ...
2
votes
0answers
221 views

Should graduate students peer-review papers? [duplicate]

Why is being part of the peer-reviewing process beneficial for a graduate student?
0
votes
1answer
91 views

Obtaining abstracts for symposium talks before vs after submitting proposal

As an early-career researcher, I would like to get some organisational experience with chairing symposia, and am considering proposing a symposium for my (sub)field, at a major conference of the (...
1
vote
0answers
109 views

Why do academics perform review for free? [duplicate]

Most of the work involved in producing a journal is done by people paid at rates higher than most academics, but the those with the rarest skills, those able to review specific scientific articles, ...