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What concerns may arise if I copied figures from my approved thesis for submission of research article. This may happen to many during their final months in lab. My thesis is submitted to the University. Shall I have copyright on my accepted thesis or my University will have? I am not sure if I need to reuse that content who will provide permission for doing so?

closed as off-topic by Wrzlprmft, Florian D'Souza, virmaior, Coder, Enthusiastic Engineer Nov 12 '17 at 17:01

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The answer to this question strongly depends on individual factors such as a certain person’s preferences, a given institution’s regulations, the exact contents of your work or your personal values. Thus only someone familiar can answer this question and it cannot be generalised to apply to others. (See this discussion for more info.)" – Wrzlprmft, Florian D'Souza, virmaior, Coder, Enthusiastic Engineer
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Please edit your question to clarify: 1) Is this about novelty or copyright? 2) Is your thesis published or will it be? 3) Why are you focussing on figures? Unless we are talking about explanatory sketches or similar, the research leading to these figures should be the same as well. – Wrzlprmft Nov 11 '17 at 12:20
  • @Wrzlprmft I included unpublished data into my thesis. We are now planning to communicate it as a research article. – BioDeveloper Nov 11 '17 at 12:31
  • Nobody here can answer whether you or your university have the copyright on your work. It depends on what contracts you signed, what employment status you had, and possibly your jurisdiction (e.g., is there an automatic copyright transfer in an employment situation?). Anyway, do you have any reason to suspect that your university does not want you to publish your results? – Wrzlprmft Nov 11 '17 at 13:19
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This is a quite common situation, so it will most likely be OK. The main points you will need to check are the following:

  • What copyright are you assigning your institution? The universities I have dealt with in the past all asked for a non-exclusive license, meaning you can publish all or portions of your thesis again if you want to. However, your institute's policies may differ; check your handbook or ask the administration.

  • Will your thesis count as a prior publication? This will depend on the venue you submit your paper to. In some places the thesis is even formally published (and has an ISBN assigned to it), which may increase the likelihood that the journal or conference will consider this work as already published. Check the venue's rules for submission and if necessary ask the editor before submitting your paper.

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