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I'm homeschooled, and I'm currently working on my high school transcript to apply to colleges. The form provided asks for a grade from A+ to F for each class. I don't know what to put as my grade for Driver's Education, a half-credit elective class with no definitive grade. On an old transcript, it simply says "PASS."

How would I convert this to GPA? 4.0? Something lower? Should I ask each college I apply to and send them different transcripts? I'm using the form instead of simply creating my own because one college requires that I use the form, whereas the rest don't appear to care.

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    Often on college transcripts P/F course grades and the course hours are not factored in to the GPA. Yes, the credits counted towards graduation requirements, but no more than that. Of course, this is usually why you are limited in the number of P/F courses you can take. – Jon Custer Sep 26 '17 at 23:23
  • @JonCuster That much I'd managed to find on the Internet. Thanks for the comment though. That's why this form is troublesome, I do wish I was able to put P or F and have it not affect the GPA. – Zenon Sep 26 '17 at 23:34
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Pass isn't a letter grade at all. Don't enter anything from the A-F scale; they are all inaccurate. Check if "P" or "S" (for Satisfactory) are possible options.

Otherwise, reread the instructions for the application. It may be that they don't want you to include "non-academic" classes like driver education at all.

If you don't find clarification, then contact the school that requires the form and ask them what you should do.

If you are computing your GPA by hand, then pass-fail classes are not included. Disregard the class completely for the purposes of GPA; leave it out of both the numerator and the denominator.

  • I tried that. If I leave the GPA section blank, it excludes the course from the numerator and includes it in the denominator. I'll call the school tomorrow, thanks! – Zenon Sep 26 '17 at 23:44
  • However, some schools use "Pass/Fail" for all first-semester or even first-year classes, which can include required courses for a major (particularly in the sciences). – aeismail Sep 27 '17 at 0:08
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    Or indeed, I had an upper-level seminar that was Pass/Fail. It's not exclusively for "non-academic" classes. – Fomite Sep 27 '17 at 0:11

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