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I am in a Ph.D. program for the past year and a half and I am very disappointed by the level of work, the agenda, and the graduate school. I want to apply for a new Ph.D. and have told to my professor that I will drop out in May, so that he has time to replace me. My question is how can I justify my dropping out correctly to the professors I want to contact to start a Ph.D. with, or in the personal statement of the applications.

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    Just give them the reasons you stopped. If they think your reasons are good they might even consider your choice as positive instead of negative - but as usual everything depends on the person you are dealing with. – louic Sep 12 '17 at 14:36
  • @louic This should be an answer. – henning -- reinstate Monica Sep 12 '17 at 15:03
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    This is actually quite common and many people change schools and even disciplines. So, it might be a good idea to be open about it. – DotPi Sep 12 '17 at 15:05
  • As DotPi said, this is pretty common. If your adviser is willing to write you a letter that corroborates your version of the story (one that shows your leaving as a mutually beneficial decision, because you want to study a different topic or at a different place, etc.) then just be upfront about it. It helps to be specific and talk about how this new institution will work where the previous one didn't: is there faculty there studying the questions you want to work on, or is it at the appropriate level that you want to achieve, etc. – David Sep 12 '17 at 17:30
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Just give them the reasons you stopped. If they think your reasons are good they might even consider your choice as positive instead of negative - but as usual everything depends on the person you are dealing with.

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