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One of the main questions in an admission interview for a master’s would be

Why do you want to attend this university?

Reading between the lines, this means:

What makes you and the university perfect for each other?

The benefit of university for the student is clear.

But what benefits does the university gain from the student?

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    I don't think the question is about how you would benefit the university. I answer this question by appealing to the university's culture and values. Commented Jul 25, 2017 at 20:38
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    I agree with @Sean. I think interviewers who ask this question are checking that your interests align with the research going on in that department. If they wanted to know about the benefits you may bring, they'd probably ask "what can you bring to this department?". Commented Jul 25, 2017 at 21:22
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    Reading between the lines, this means...-- [citation needed] Stop overthinking. The question means exactly what it says. If they wanted to ask a different question, they would have.
    – JeffE
    Commented Jul 26, 2017 at 2:46

1 Answer 1

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  • If the student actively participates in and contributes to classes and department events, the university benefits.

  • If the student works for the university in a lab or as a TA, and does a good job, the university benefits.

  • If the student publishes interesting, useful, or important work while still a student, it reflects well on the university, and the university benefits.

  • If the student goes on to do great things after graduating, it reflects well on the university, and the university benefits.

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