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I have graduated with a master's and have maintained collaboration with my advisor to publish papers. I have a paper accepted in a rank A+ conference of my field.

My university e-mail address is still active but my advisor recommended I use my gmail address. I should be starting a PhD next year at the same institution so the address is likely to stay active. I put this university as affiliation since I did the work there.

Assuming I use the gmail address, should I add a footnote to my name saying "Work completed while an MSc student at institution" to explain the affiliation?

In acknowledgements, authors acknowledge grants for funding their work. Is it a place where an alumni can say he did the work as a student at the institution?

I've seen this done for papers published by students about work done during internships at companies while providing a university affiliation, such as "This work was completed while name was at company" but never have I seen this for alumni. Is it because it doesn't happen often, or would a footnote be perceived as pompous?

Edit: A comment suggested this question possibly duplicates What affiliation to put on an academic paper for alumni authors? . This is not the case, I said in the question "I put this university as affiliation since I did the work there." . My question is about adding a footnote, or an acknowledgement, indicating I was a student there when I did the work. Question edited for clarity.

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assuming I use the gmail address, should I add a footnote to my name saying "Work completed while an MSc student at institution" to justify the affiliation?

No, because you never need to justify right in the paper why your affiliation is indicated the way it is, or why you picked one e-mail address over another.

I've seen this done for papers published by students about work done during internships at companies, such as "This work was completed while name was at company"

I can imagine the benefit here is to inform readers that company is not a likely place to get in touch with name any more. That can be useful information, but it is most likely not provided just as an explanation of why a particular e-mail address was chosen.

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    I think in the case of companies the scenario is often: the student publishes with his university email along with people from the company who use their company email, and they add a footnote to say the student performed the work while he was at the company. In my opinion it often has more to do with prestige than with informing the reader since the university email is provided in the first place. – EOF Jul 21 '17 at 10:32
  • @darms (?)i've never seen someone both use the affiliation (XYZ) in the autthor list as well as list a footnote explaining that they also did the work at (XYZ). (prestige isn't the consideration, but credit to XYZ support). It is when the author affiliation listed is ABC but the work was done at XYZ that occasionally a footnote will be required to note that work was performed while affiliated with institution XYZ. Readers usually look at the listed affiliation for that purpose (not email address. A different email would just be assumed to be related to 'current' affiliation if article delay) – Carol Jul 21 '17 at 12:31
  • @darms: That may be the case. I am not too sure about the "prestige" reason, though - maybe that's just me, but it would seem quite a bit more prestiguous to me if company X worked with university Y (at which point the student was the representative of university Y in the collaboration), than if one of company X's employees at the time of writing the paper now happens to study at university Y. – O. R. Mapper Jul 21 '17 at 12:37
  • @O.R.Mapper The situation is mostly PhD students interning at companies. – EOF Jul 21 '17 at 12:40
  • @Carol I agree with you and therefore will not add anything, thank you for answering my question. – EOF Jul 21 '17 at 12:40

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