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There are already works in several academic fields written in Esperanto. Is it destined to become the new academic language, replacing English?

Esperanto is a constructed language that is easier to learn than English.

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    What do you mean by easier to 'learn'? English is a very relaxed language, making it easy to put your point across but hard to understand what someone else says.
    – Jessica B
    Commented Jul 7, 2017 at 21:25
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    There are already works in several academic fields written in German. Is it destined to become the new academic language, replacing English? German is a natural language that is easier to learn than English.
    – sgf
    Commented Jul 8, 2017 at 1:04
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    Linguist here. Esperanto is more regular than English, but it is a native language for almost no one, and the number of speakers is limited. And whether it is easy to learn depends, to some extent, on the learner's native language(s). No particular reason at the moment to expect it to catch on, particularly in academia (which tends to be fond of tradition). Nonetheless, Esperanto is a fascinating case-study and I will very happily refer any interested reader to Arika Okrent's In the Land of Invented Languages (2009) if they want to learn more about it and other constructed languages.
    – trikeprof
    Commented Jul 8, 2017 at 3:28
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    A couple of data points: In mathematics, there is, as far as I know, just one journal with a title in Esperanto, namely "Funkcialaj Ekvacioj." I just visited its web site and, on a quick look, found nothing in Esperanto beyond the title. I am also aware of one article written in French but with an abstract in Esperanto. The author, Bruno Poizat, is known for (among other things) his strong disapproval of English hegemony in academia. Commented Jul 8, 2017 at 3:59
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    I did take a look at the Wiki page provided below and some other references. I can tell this: For me, a native Chinese speaker, Esperanto is much much much much harder to learn than English. This is one data point.
    – Nobody
    Commented Jul 8, 2017 at 5:27

2 Answers 2

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According to Wikipedia, Esperanto is spoken by:

Native: Around 1,000 families involving around 2,000 children (2004)[1] L2 users: estimates range from 100,000 total (1999)[2][not in citation given] to 10 million total (1996)[3]

At best, those seem to be some generous numbers.

Given the language has been around since the late 1800s, unless there is some dramatic shift in rate in which people acquire proficiency in the language, the simple answer is "no."

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Given that German, French and Russian are becoming extinct as academic languages except for niche disciplines, given that the Chinese have significant incentives to publish in English, the trend is clear: there is (regrettably?) little to no incentive for most academic to publish in languages other than English if they want their work to be recognized.

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