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To many of you this might sound extremely ambitious, but I am already doing a lot of innovative things in my area of expertise. I think the results from this research could benefit the general public. It would be nice for me to be able to write my results in a formal paper and publish it. However I am not affiliated with any university and I know how much scrutiny there is in publishing.

So assuming I have a paper written what are my next steps to publish it?

closed as too broad by Pete L. Clark, Buzz, Fomite, scaaahu, Coder Sep 16 '17 at 10:30

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    This question is far too broad in my opinion. The answer to your question as it stands is "find a suitable journal and submit the paper". If you are up to speed with the literature in your field you should have some idea of a suitable venue to publish in. If you're interested in the actual process of submitting an article, look at this question. – astronat Jul 6 '17 at 14:34
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    related: academia.stackexchange.com/a/91138/41302 – Walter Jul 6 '17 at 15:02
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    If you have a paper written, the next step would simply be to submit it to the journal of your choice once you have done the formatting... – BlaB Jul 6 '17 at 15:50
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    "To many of you this might sound extremely ambitious, but I am already doing a lot of innovative things in my area of expertise." - This is funny. In fact, the oposite is true. Most users in this site are involved in doing innovative things. Since you don't say anything about yourself, this sounds nothing close to "extremely ambitious". – Shake Baby Jul 6 '17 at 18:45
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    I posted @astronat comment as an answer. It's a perfect answer and I couldn't resist posting it. Sorry. – RenatoDias Jul 6 '17 at 18:58
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Find a suitable journal and submit the paper.

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    I'll add the traditional Academia.SE warning: suitable journal means, among other things, one that is not from a predatory publisher. There are many questions/answers here on this SE site and other resources around the web. – Bryan Krause Jul 6 '17 at 19:06
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    @RenatoDias couldn't have put it better myself ;) – astronat Jul 6 '17 at 19:08
  • Some ideas on how to find those suitables journals that would publish my independent research? :) – user2789433 Jul 7 '17 at 22:32
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    The same ones that would publish it if you were affiliated to a university. – RenatoDias Jul 9 '17 at 5:25
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I agree with the existing "Find a suitable journal and submit the paper." answer, but a bit more detail may be helpful.

An experienced professor as academic advisor can be especially helpful to a new researcher in two areas, knowing what is innovative and selecting a venue.

To know that a particular idea is new requires broad knowledge of related research. Similarly, selecting an appropriate venue requires experience with the various journals and conferences. Objectively judging the standard and degree of interest of your own paper relative to the papers typically published in a journal can be especially difficult.

To do those things yourself requires a lot of reading of papers in your field, and often related fields. Read to select papers that should be referenced in your paper. Read to know the style and structure of papers in your field. Read to know what sorts of papers are published where.

Select a journal where, based on its stated scope and other papers it has published, you believe your paper would best fit. Go to that journal's web site. Look for "information for authors" or similar. If you cannot find that, use the "contact us" information to ask.

Follow the journal's process for submitting a paper. Be careful to follow all formatting guidelines. Await results. There are many questions and answers here on what results you might get and what to do about them. Broadly, the paper may be accepted or rejected outright, but often there will be questions and requests for revision. The process should improve the paper. If the final decision is rejection, consider submitting to a lower prestige journal, one that publishes less important papers than your first choice. However, avoid publishing in a predatory journal.

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