15

In my CV, I include my dissertation topic within my education part like this:

From start-time to end-time
Master of something, University at somewhere
Dissertation title: something

However, I also see some people include their dissertation in publication part even though it's not published publicly. So, I wonder if doing that is acceptable and advisable.

8

I think it is best to put your dissertation under its own heading "Dissertation". Even though this wastes a little space it makes the thesis easily identifiable. The value of a dissertation will diminish with time after the PhD so you can change its location later you want to conserve space. But, particularly in your early career many want to be able to clearly see what you wrote up for your thesis work.

  • But what is the advantage of separating dissertations into 1 section instead of including them as a part of education history? – Long Thai Apr 3 '13 at 20:07
  • 1
    @LongThai Ok, if you list your bachelors thesis, masters thesis or equivalent then that would make perfect sense as you say. I was not considering listing anything pre-PhD other than as degrees in the educational part of the CV. Any way would be good as long as he thesis is easily found. I would also add that a PhD thesis is usualy what counts afer the PhD. I doubt many would look for any thesis of a lower degree. – Peter Jansson Apr 3 '13 at 20:10
  • @PeterJansson: does that apply generally or only in specific fields (e.g.: computer science, mathematics)? I wonder if this also applies to social science and humanities. – deathlock May 1 '13 at 23:44
7

I argue for including the dissertation explicitly as a publication item, preferably in a separate section "Theses", or "Theses, technical reports and pre-prints" (including other theses, such as master thesis, if publicly available). Of course the solution also marginally depends on the habits and regulations of the country where you completed the thesis. In countries like Germany, a dissertation thesis is required to be submitted to the university library, subsequently it is catalogued by the German National Library (Dissonline section) and receives an ISBN, hence it can be treated as a proper publication. As far as I know, also in the Netherlands, dissertations are published as books with proper ISBN assigned, hence proper archival publications too. In the past (not sure about current situation) some other countries, such as Slovakia, even master theses were required to be archived and made publicly available on request by the university libraries.

  • Rather interesting. Did not know this ISBN issue in Germany. In Austria, a dissertation has to be submitted to the university library (after grading) and it will be catalogued in prior (during submission to the educational institute) (but without an ISBN afaik). media.obvsg.at/dissdb – mnemonic Apr 6 '13 at 14:17
3

Some people publish their theses as part of a monograph series. In that case, it could appear under "books," but should still be identified as the PhD thesis.

In other circumstances, I would not include it under "Publications," but instead list it more or less as you suggest. (Under "Dissertation Topic" as part of "Education.")

3

I think your method (thesis title in the education section) is the standard one. Though I notice your example doesn't have the advisor's name, which should be there too. If the thesis was published separately as a monograph, or several articles, I would still list the thesis title in the education section as well as the papers/monographs in the publication section.

0

yes, you can include it & you should include it because many persons would be eager to see an information regarding your dissertation. btw If you are using LaTeX to write your cv, BibTeX provides an entry regarding dissertations - phdthesis. when having an ISBN, then you can use the (BibTeX) book entry and your publication part. without an ISBN, use (BibTeX) phdthesis entry within the education area of your cv which was proposed in another prior answer.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.