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Note: This question is aimed at "in general, in the United States, given the laws (including FERPA) and typical practices of US Universities".

I'm wondering if my schools' departmental advisers can give my grades to faculty members without my permission. Say a faculty member is talking to the department advisers about me. What is standard procedure here?

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    Closely related: academia.stackexchange.com/questions/84931/…. Short answer: wide variation. It's entirely possible that faculty could get your grades, or might already have direct online access. No laws restrict sharing of grades within a university, so long as it is for educational purposes (which includes almost everything). – Nate Eldredge May 15 '17 at 18:16
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    Data point of 1: I can access the grades of any student that is attending / has attended my university. (So, e.g., when you go talk to your faculty advisor, and they ask you how things went last semester, just tell them the truth.) – Mad Jack May 15 '17 at 18:51
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    Here's another data point. I can get access to the transcript at my college for any student who is currently enrolled in one of my classes, or for any student who took a class from me in the past and completed the term without dropping. For any student who didn't fall into those categories, I would have to ask for the information from someone else who had access (e.g., dean or counselor). For example, this could come up if a student wanted to challenge a prerequisite for a class that I'm teaching. – Ben Crowell May 15 '17 at 20:56
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Faculty are almost always bound by rules governing their access to student records. For example at my university, I can access any student record on campus if I have a justifiable reason. If I were to access student records that I didn't have justifiable reason for accessing that would be a major violation of policy.

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I'm wondering if my schools' departmental advisers can give my grades to faculty members without my permission.

Yes. The school's own policies will determine how, when, where and why. Your permission is never required for communications about you within any school between faculty, staff and officials as long as it is pertinent to their job.

Say a faculty member is talking to the department advisers about me. What is standard procedure here?

The procedure is school specific and will usually be spelled out in either the faculty handbook or employee handbook. You will not be able to access either of these as you are neither.

It would be unusual for faculty to not talk to advisors about students, although that partly depends upon how the role of "advisor" is defined. It is common for faculty to be required to provide to advisors any form of academic warning regarding students. Let me give you a simple example. Imagine you were taking "Introduction to Microeconomics," and were struggling with the algebra. In many schools, the professor would inform the advisor that the student should take appropriate math courses in future semesters. How can they give advice if they do not know what is going on?

It also goes in the other direction, an advisor that became aware of an issue with the student should, where appropriate, pass that information on to the faculty teaching that student.

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