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I'm posting this on behalf of my friend. I'll address my friend as 'I' in this question to make it more readable.

I'm currently an undergraduate studying podiatry outside US. Over the course of 3 years, I've moved around to 5 different universities, studying 5 different majors, in 3 different countries, for personal reasons. I've finally settled down in one country, but I've quickly realized that I'm not interested in podiatry. I'm thinking of applying to US universities for masters program in speech pathology, which is vastly different from podiatry. Since I know that I won't be pursuing further degree in podiatry, I'm thinking of changing to another school (my school does not offer anything related to speech pathology), but I'm afraid that with so many transfers in my record, another transfer may not look favorable in grad school admission.

My question is: Is it better, in terms of admission to master's program, to change school to study something more relevant to grad school major, or stick with the current school and get over with undergraduate?

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    Finish a degree. Any degree. Then supplement the completed coursework with things that will enhance your grad school applications. – aparente001 May 6 '17 at 4:42
  • Graduate school admission committees are going to question your ability to finish anything, without changing your mind about what you want to study. What are you going to say in your application to convinced them you will stick with speech pathology long enough to finish their program? Which course of action will better support your claims? – Patricia Shanahan May 6 '17 at 9:24
  • @aparente001 it seems that people like your comment. Would you like to make your comment an answer so that I can accept it? – Hosea May 8 '17 at 13:24
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Finish a degree. Any degree. Then supplement the completed coursework with things that will enhance your grad school applications. You're almost there -- just get it over with, and then figure out what additional courses you'd like to take or audit.

Note also that many colleges and universities will limit late credit transfers. I imagine they want a degree from their institution to reflect their institutional identity.

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