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In order to publish my paper at The Journal the cover letter should include four (4) experts in the field as potential reviewers for the manuscript. I ask some professors to have their permission to include their name as reviewers and find 4. I sent their details to the Journal. I didn’t hear anything back from the journal after 8 months, then I sent an email asking about the status of my manuscript and they indicated that they received one review for this time and they are waiting for the second. Now almost one year has passed for my manuscript, and the Journal is still waiting for the second review.

Should I send an email to the reviewers to ask them to read my manuscript?

  • A year in review?!!! What kind of journal is this and why would you ever submit your work there? There's not a single journal in the world that advertises on their website that "we'll get back to you within a year". So definitely bug the editor, you should have done this 10 months ago. – warship Apr 9 '17 at 15:58
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    @warship that's way more common than you believe, including for serious journals. Journals promising that reviews will be done in less than a month are the ones to avoid... roro, you shouldn't need to ask professors their permission, they can easily decline if and when the editor contacts them. – Marc Glisse Apr 9 '17 at 17:17
  • @MarcGlisse Most serious journals (the very high impact ones), let you know within a week if your article passes editorial board review and proceeds on to referees (reviewers). Then, it takes between 1-2.5 months to get the first round of revisions back. From OP's post, I understand that he hasn't received the editor's first round of revisions (usually composed of reviews from 2-3 referees), which is highly suspicious. But, all in all, a paper can be in review for over a year. Been there done that. But not first round of revisions. Ever... at least in my field. – warship Apr 9 '17 at 18:49
  • @MarcGlisse,@warship I already sent them an email and I am waiting for their response. What do you suggest I do if the manuscript is still under review, should I withdraw the submission? Thank you for your help and time – roro Apr 11 '17 at 20:17
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No.

You don't (and shouldn't) know who your reviewers are. The editor could have ignored your suggestions entirely, or even used them as a list of conflicted people not to ask to review your paper.

Feel free to bug the editor again, but leave it to the editor to bug the referee(s).

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    Lists of suggested reviewers considered harmful. – Fred Douglis Apr 9 '17 at 14:55
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    But do contact the journal. Shameful as it may seem, editors sometimes just let a paper slip through the cracks, or they procrastinate on hassling a reviewer who's many months late, or they just keep waiting and hoping a reviewer will magically show up. Obviously you shouldn't imply any of that in your letter; just send a friendly note and see if something coincidentally happens shortly thereafter. – octern Apr 9 '17 at 16:31
  • @octern I already sent them an email and I am waiting for their response. What do you suggest I do if the manuscript is still under review, should I withdraw the submission? Thank you for your help and time – roro Apr 11 '17 at 20:18
  • I'd be comfortable saying that the journal is failing to do right by you and your field, but that doesn't mean you should withdraw. There's no way I can give you advice on the practical question of what will be best for advancing your career. You should ask one or more professors in your own field. – octern Apr 11 '17 at 21:40
  • @octern Ok, Thank you for your time I appreciate your help. – roro Apr 11 '17 at 23:10

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