-1

I have a PhD offer from a German university in Nanotechnology. It is a 3 year position (which is a short span). I would like to know how is the general experience of doing a PhD in Germany? Is it really hectic? I am focused and dedicated towards my work but want to spare time for other activities too. So, would really appreciate any insight into PhD student's life, thanks!

closed as primarily opinion-based by Massimo Ortolano, Wrzlprmft, lighthouse keeper, Bob Brown, BrianH Mar 25 '17 at 22:12

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 5
    You mean academic life? Social life? Cultural life? What? We have no idea what you are asking. Doing a PhD in Germany is no different than doing PhD in any other country and depends on a matter of factors such as: the group, the field, the adviser etc. The question, as it is, it's impossible to answer. – PsySp Mar 25 '17 at 16:07
  • 1
    3 or 4 years is the normal timespan for a phd scholarship in Europe. Unlike the US, we assume that the candidates already hold a master, so there isn't much coursework and most of this time is devoted to research (and TAing/tutoring, in many cases). – Federico Poloni Mar 25 '17 at 19:43
2

As said before, during your PhD you are not required to take any courses. 3 years fund is the norm. Extensions would be max to a forth year. If you stick to the time plan of your PhD you can pull it off if you have a guarantee that any technical difficulties can be managed in time. Make sure that the team you are joining have the necessary experience in the specific topic of your PhD so you can more likely find help if things go south. Also try to make a clear agreement with your advisor on sticking to the time plan or possibilities to extend the fund if necessary.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.