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I completed my PhD and post-PhD. Since last year I am working as a researcher in my country, at the lowest level of hierarchy (first out of five) It usually takes no less than 4 years of steady research to advance to the next level. These levels are named (translated to English)

  • Assistant researcher
  • Associate/Adjunct researcher
  • Independent researcher
  • Principal researcher
  • Superior/Top researcher

My employer is the government (Argentina), and I work at a government-funded institute.

Although I understand that this likely varies for different countries, what designation do you believe describes my position more accurately?

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  • What does the title in your contract state? – The Guy Mar 2 '17 at 21:31
  • The literal translation to english would be Assistant researcher. – Gabriel Mar 2 '17 at 21:34
  • I see your point. Could you just list the diff. 5 levels (as translated to English)? Maybe it will help others. – The Guy Mar 2 '17 at 21:36
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    In the US, a "research assistant" is typically a graduate student, or occasionally an undergraduate. A "fellow" is somebody funded by a scholarship - it indicates you aren't being funded because of the merits of your research project but primarily because of your personal merits as a scholar. Research Associate is the same title given to post docs, and including the information from your previous post I think it is most appropriate for you. – Bryan Krause Mar 2 '17 at 21:46
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    My suggestion if you were wanting your CV to be most understandable to someone in the US or familiar with the US system would be to write your title from your contract, untranslated, and in parentheses you could translate it as "Research Associate." – Bryan Krause Mar 2 '17 at 21:48
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In the US, a "research assistant" is typically a graduate student, or occasionally an undergraduate. A "fellow" is somebody funded by a scholarship - it indicates you aren't being funded because of the merits of your research project but primarily because of your personal merits as a scholar. Sometimes "fellows" are also more senior positions (senior non-professor PhD roles in academic laboratories, or some PhD researchers outside academia) and there the title implies some additional autonomy beyond other employees.

Research Associate is the title typically given to post docs, but can be more broad than "post doc" which implies a training position. Including the information from your previous post I think it is the title that would be used in a US context that is most equivalent to the position you describe. Note that all of these designations apply mostly to academia: titles in industry can be completely different and vary a lot by field.

My suggestion if you were wanting your CV to be most understandable to someone in the US or familiar with the US system would be to write your title from your contract, untranslated, and in parentheses you could translate it as "Research Associate."

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    No- invert the order - Research Associate or Research Assistant still give strong connotation of a 'student' title in US and as reader would first assume it is a student and t I would have to spend time perusing for other clues. Using the order inverted - Associate Researcher or Assistant Researcher, works better as the 'person is the researcher, - I might assume it is non-academia title, but at that point, I'm looking for 'where' the person is a researcher, not whether they are a student or not. – Carol Mar 3 '17 at 19:32

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