0

I've always wanted to study abroad simply because I believe knowledge expands a person's world view. However, I've not been able to find a program that I can fit into.

I had my undergraduate degree in Economics, which I really didn't find interesting, I enjoyed and can still recall after five year topics from my Psychology electives simply because they were more practical. Although I found Game theory quite interesting.

I've been programming for over a decade now and work full time as a software developer and despite living in a low wage country, am quite comfortable.

However, I would like to pursue an advanced degree. I tried reaching out to Computer Science departments in the US, Canada and Europe but most keep referring to my first degree. I would like to find out if there are fields that combine my interest.

closed as off-topic by Wrzlprmft, Cape Code, Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩, user2390246, scaaahu Aug 19 '16 at 12:48

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • ""Shopping" questions, which seek recommendations or lists of individual universities, academic programs, publishers, journals, research topics or similar as an answer or seek an assessment or comparison of such, are off-topic here. (See this discussion for more information.)" – Wrzlprmft, Cape Code, Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩, user2390246, scaaahu
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

0

The first thing that jumps to mind is something in data science, perhaps applied to analyzing big data sets in a field such as financial modeling, behaviorial economics, etc. Your software development background will leave little doubt that you could learn to implement data analysis algorithms in R or Python as needed, and your economics degree would be an asset if your were applying your data analysis skills toward problems in that field. Graduate data science programs in the US typically allow people to enter from a wide variety of undergraduate fields, provided that you have demonstrable ability in math and programming.

0

What about computational economics? It is heavy on programming and game theory.

To explore more, try to find a professor doing this. Figure out some coauthors. Also find the conferences on his or her CV and look at the conference proceedings to see if you are interested in the subject and to find more contacts.

For instance you could start by looking into Conitzer at Duke. https://users.cs.duke.edu/~conitzer/

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.