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I will start a systematic literature review of my research topic. Before embarking on this venture, I searched for already existing systematic reviews, mapping or survey papers but I have not found any literature review or survey that directly relates to my topic although I have found many surveys which are related to one aspect of my research area but not whole. (e.g. my topic is Methods of Y in Z. I have found existing reviews related to Methods of Y but they do not cover Z.)

I have been taking notes from these papers as I read them. Now my question is: What would be the value of these existing reviews in my literature review? Can I refer these to justify my review with the fact that they do not cover my whole research area? or refer some interesting points raised by existing reviews in my review?

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Yes and yes:

"Can I refer these to justify my review with the fact that they do not cover my whole research area?" When publishing any scholarly research, it is important to demonstrate the originality of your work. If you can show that people have done work similar to yours yet not quite on topic or not as comprehensive, then it shows that you are aware of other scholars' work and that you are clear on your unique contribution to the body of related literature.

"or refer some interesting points raised by existing reviews in my review?" Since the other reviews are similar, then certainly you should summarize and quote them on aspects that do have some bearing to your own topic. After all, you probably learned something from reading them that informed your own work; you should present these parts to your readers for their learning as well.

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