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I obtained my Sociology degree after 5 years (stipulated) university studies in Spain (Licenciatura) in 2004. Now with Bologna, sociology is only a four-year graduate program.

I am not sure whether to put on my CV that I have a Master (3+2) or Bachelor Degree and how to abbreviate it: MA, BA, or else way.

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    You write on your CV what you actually have. – David Richerby May 2 '16 at 15:50
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Just call it a Licenciatura and indicate in parentheses that it is a five-year undergraduate course of study. For example you might say (obviously adjusting to the format of your C.V.)

2004 - Licenciatura en sociología (5 year undergraduate degree in sociology), Complutense University of Madrid.
2004 - Lic. Sociología (equiv. B.S./B.A. Sociology), Complutense University of Madrid.

The reason I'd recommend not translating it as a masters is that the licenciatura not considered a graduate level program (you could homologar 4-year undergraduate U.S. bachelor programs into licenciaturas back in the day), and seeing the abbreviation M.A./M.S. would imply that it is graduate level. You can discuss it in a cover letter if you feel the need to explain it further.

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    While the advice to indicate the original degree is reasonable, isn't it kind of the point of the question that the categorization of some pre-Bologna degrees as "undergraduate" or "graduate" level is ill-defined when there was historically no such distinction? For instance, German university Diplom degrees are sometimes described as "undergraduate" (because students did not graduate with any other degree before the Diplom) and roughly equivalent to a Master's (because of the duration, and because what used to be Diplom programs was converted into Bachelor + Master programs). – O. R. Mapper May 10 '16 at 6:05
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    @O.R.Mapper in those cases I'd probably avoid saying undergraduate, and just state the rough or actual equivalency. The question was about a licentiatura specifically, though – user0721090601 Apr 3 at 16:28

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