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I know that similar questions have been asked regarding PhD's, but I was hoping for specific guidance on my plans for an Ed.D.

I am 38 and I am a career changer; I went from being in the Army, to working for a distribution center. Now, I'm a third year elementary teacher overseas in Hanoi, Vietnam.

I love my new career and I just finished an MSED in Elementary Reading and Literacy. I've been accepted into the Liberty University Ed.S. program in Curriculum and Instruction. In the beginning, I planned on finishing my education there. But, I realized that going for an Ed.D. would require only an additional 30 credit hours. So, I have really been considering it.

I would love to continue teaching while I chip away at the Ed.D and I would continue to teach until I have 10 years experience (making me 45 years old).

My question is: would I be too old to get a job teaching at a university at this age? I would love to continue teaching overseas, but would return to the US for the right job. In addition to being a career changer, I'm new married with two young babies. So, I want to make sure that I set us up for a good future.

Thanks in advance for your help.

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    What are you hoping to teach in a university? Elementary education? At least at the universities I'm familiar with, practical experience is considered valuable in this field, and many of the faculty in the college of education have a decade or more of teaching experience before they start teaching the teachers, so to speak. Most of them did not follow a consecutive bachelors -> masters -> doctorate -> professor path, and so they're not particularly young. – ff524 Apr 26 '16 at 0:56
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    Thanks for your reply, ff524. Yes, I would love to teach elementary education and would have 10 years of experience before I sought a job teaching at a university. I also did not follow a linear degree path: I have a BA in Sociology, and MBA, and MSED and would have the Ed.D. I hope this does not limit my opportunities. – Myong Hwan Eiselstein Apr 26 '16 at 1:04
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    Do you have any reason to believe it would limit your opportunities? I don't really see the reason for this question. – ff524 Apr 26 '16 at 1:05
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    Keep in mind that the Ed.D. is typically considered to be a degree for educators working in K12. You would typically need to have a PhD to become a professor of education. – Brian Borchers Apr 26 '16 at 4:24
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    @BrianBorchers I thought so too at first, but then I looked at the credentials of faculty in my university's college of education, and there are more than a few with an EdD and not a PhD (albeit from much more prestigious universities than Liberty University...) – ff524 Apr 26 '16 at 6:55
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In education, the students tend to be slightly "older" because they are required to have practical teaching experience in the classroom. One school I worked at required master level education students to have at least one year in the classroom. Another school I worked at required 3 years of teaching experience before acceptance into the PhD program. This automatically pushes the youngest Ed phds into at best the early thirties.

Brilliance is not enough in education you also need the wisdom of experience in order to guide the next generation of teachers who will be of mixed-ability. Your background and wide experience would be attractive to liberal arts colleges. EdD is usually a practitioner degree involving, as you can guess, practical skills for K12 teaching and leadership. PhD is much more theoretical in nature and preparatory for conducting research.

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