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I am currently in my last semester of BS degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics. I am in the middle of applying for a number of taught Master's programmes in both the US and in Asia, most of which are 1-year and full-time.

My grades are fairly good, with a cumulative GPA of ~3.7 and a major GPA of 3.9+ in CS. Unfortunately I have no research experience (that's why I chose to apply for taught Masters in the first place) and frankly have not much besides grades to show admissions.

So my question is: besides having strong letters of recommendation, what can I do to increase my chances?

I understand the "correct" answer differs from institute to institute and from country to country, but some general pointers are very much appreciated.

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So my question is: besides having strong letters of recommendation, what can I do to increase my chances?

Not much. You're applying right now, so there's no time to make your application look stronger. However, in math at least, no prior research experience is expected for master's programs, or even most PhD programs in the US. Your GPA looks fine to me. I don't think you should have trouble getting into a good master's program in the US (in math or CS) provided you're coming from a quality school and have good letters. You could also consider sending out some applications for PhD programs if that's what you want.

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As per the other answer, not much, but if you have a specific interest:

One of the things that we look for in CS/ECE/Math is what track the student wants to pursue with the Masters and why. We have a thesis masters and a course work masters. If you can identify an area of interest in your cover letter, we often can match the student with a professor in an area of research. I've found funding for my MS students who were interested in topics that I was in the past as well.

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