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I am currently working on a paper where we use one image from another paper. How and where should I denote that?

Currently, we have the image source only in the caption like this:

\caption{Comparison of a \gls{CNN} for classification (top)
         and a \gls{FCN} which creates a heat map (bottom).
         \cite{long2014fully}}
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    This is certainly not correct; the citation has to be a part of a sentence. It really depends on what you cite -- the image itself (i.e., you "printscreen" it) which may be a copyright infringement, or the data used in the image? – yo' Sep 21 '15 at 9:39
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    Well, in that case you either have the copyright holder's permission (and then you probably just say something like image taken from \cite{abc} or you violate the copyright and in that case you ... well ... shouldn't do it. – yo' Sep 21 '15 at 9:42
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    @Oxinabox You believe that most venues have strict style manuals? In my life, I have rarely seen any style manuals. – yo' Sep 21 '15 at 9:52
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The right thing to do when plan to include an image from another article is to first ask for the permission from the corresponding author of the article. If approved, you may include the image and cite them along with the lines after the caption

Included with permission from [citeno].

General citation would only allow you to refer information in literature. Any form of replication whether it is an image or even a set of sentences of text is not permitted without acknowledgement from the authors of the published material to be referred. The exception is for quotes and equations (with appropriate citations). That doesn't forbid you to use the text at all. It means that you ought to rephrase the information referred in you own words.

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    Any form of replication whether it is an image or even a sentence of text is not permitted without acknowledgement from the authors of the published material to be referred. - You're talking about copyright law here, aren't you? I guess at least for texts the situation is different in Germany. Parts of a text may be copied, as long as it's clear which parts got copied and as long as the copying is not "too much" (see §51 UrhG) – Martin Thoma Sep 21 '15 at 11:35
  • Suggestion accepted. Edit made. But on copyright, all materials published are implicitly copyrighted even if not formally done so. – Ébe Isaac Sep 21 '15 at 13:11
  • This is plain wrong. Very rarely it is the corresponding author who holds the image copyright. More likely it is the publisher. We were solving this issue with one guy in my community, and we ended up with him giving me the plot data and not the image, to avoid this issue. – yo' Sep 21 '15 at 13:12
  • Actually not all publishers hold copyrights for the images like IEEE. – Ébe Isaac Sep 21 '15 at 14:18

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