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I want to cite a senior project of a student in my thesis. However, I don't really have much information about the student.

I know, the title of his work, his name, his university and the link to the pdf file. I know that it is a senior project, because the link is something like

university.edu/.../SeniorProject_NameSurname.pdf

What should the BibTeX code be for this situation?

Thanks in advance.

  • Do you know the year when it was published? If so, it's a good idea to include it in the citation. – Federico Poloni Jun 27 '15 at 9:02
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First step

When I'm not sure about citation format, I usually use Google Scholar to create it for me.


BibTeX code will look similar to this:

@misc{abbreviation,
   author = {Name Surname},
   title = {Title},
   institution = {University},
   url = {URL}
}

If your style does not have the 'url' parameter, then 'note' is usually used for this purpose.

  note = "[Online; accessed 19-July-2008]"

And as Aleksandr Blekh pointed out, it's good to look in the list of possible BibTeX entries and choose the right format (phdthesis, article, book etc.).


Editors

Otherwise, for creating and editing larger citation "databases" I use JabRef. And lately I've found a simple online program for creating BibTeX citations too.

  • I searched the title, and google scholar had no results. I found the study by googling on web. Can google Scholar create a bibtex code, even if it doesn't have it in search results? – ThePortakal Jun 26 '15 at 23:11
  • AFAIK it can't, but you can write it according to the one I've added to my answer. And, by the way, I don't think this is a suitable question for Academia. It should belong to tex.stackexchange.com . – Eenoku Jun 26 '15 at 23:14
  • 3
    Actually, the phdthesis reference type would be wrong in this case (perhaps, you didn't pay enough attention to or misunderstood the question's circumstances). The OP wants to cite a project in their thesis, not to cite a thesis somewhere else. Therefore, the reference type should IMHO be either unpublished, or misc (see this document). – Aleksandr Blekh Jun 27 '15 at 0:40
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    @AleksandrBlekh Oh, my mistake, I mixed up a senior project with a final thesis, in my country it's sometimes called in a similar way. I'll correct my answer and add your link to it. – Eenoku Jun 27 '15 at 8:47
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While a BibTeX code per se, obviously, is limited to including fields for only known parameters of the reference, the exact code for citation formatting would significantly depend on the required (or desired) publication style, which you haven't mentioned. For some help with the customizing your bibliography's look for your needs, please see links and references in my related answer.

  • What's the difference in the code of citations? AFAIK the code is still the same, only the appearance of citations is changed according to the publication style used. – Eenoku Jun 27 '15 at 8:53
  • @MartinBeseda: The "appearance of citations", which in my answer I referred to as "citation formatting", is an essential part of bibliography. It is important to make sure the formatting style matches the one, recommended in a particular publication style guide. Thus, there might be a need to customize the style, using LaTeX code for formatting (style) as well, hence my answer. – Aleksandr Blekh Jun 27 '15 at 18:09

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