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I will be applying for admission into graduate school in Fall 2016.

I did research with a professor last summer in mathematical biology. I have presented that research at a two conferences and have presented a poster at three. However, my professor did not require me to write a research paper.

With respect to a graduate program in mathematics, would this hurt my chances of being admitted?

Thank you.

EDIT: I was following a timeline my professor created for me and writing a paper was not on it.

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    Writing a research paper is not something you do because you're "required to." – Kimball Jun 17 '15 at 16:39
  • @Kimball: I suppose... I think I know what you are saying. I did not write one because I was following a timeline he created for me and writing a paper was not in that timeline. – SOULed_Outt Jun 17 '15 at 16:42
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    I was following a timeline my professor created for me and writing a paper was not on it. — I don't think I've ever seen a research project timeline that had "writing a paper" listed as one of the tasks. – Mad Jack Jun 17 '15 at 19:06
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    I've seen plenty with 'final report' on it, but that is often something completely different... – Jon Custer Jun 18 '15 at 16:21
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Speaking as someone in field not too far from yours: sure, it would help if you had done all of the stuff you've listed and written a paper about it. But having a bunch of conference presentations under your belt (oral and posters) is still pretty impressive; and there are many applicants to Ph.D. programs without any research experience at all. The fact that you've done research, and that your advisor thought it was worth presenting at multiple conferences, is a pretty big item in your favor.

Oh, and it should go without saying that this professor should be one of your recommenders (absent any major falling-out or other complicating circumstances.)

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