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Imagine I'm doing research on my own, and studying at a university. I publish this research, get accepted, and now I have to provide my affiliation. I have no problems of course using my university and the department I'm studying for, and in fact, I want to. However, I've read (on this site) that using my personal @gmail.com email looks unprofessional even if you provide the university as affiliation. I have a student email but looks quite awful like: lmatteis.123112311@studenti.uniroma1.it - where the number is my student code number.

Is that ugly email better than a personal @gmail.com email?

Another option would be that I go talk to a professor, show that the paper got accepted and ask them whether they can give me a quick affiliation; provide me with the email... but then I'd probably need to add the professor as a co-author as well, which I guess is also fine? This option would however take much longer. But maybe a good way to build connections with professors in the department.

Thoughts?

EDIT

The question that appears linked is a different question. It talks about "rotting emails" and the possibility of using your personal email to avoid that. My question is regarding what email I should provide for a research that I want my university to be affiliated with, although I haven't been officially given any email by the university (apart from my student email).

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    Why would you need to add the professor as a co-author just because you show the paper to him? You absolutely do not need to add the prof as co-author if he has no contribution to the paper. However, if he does have contribution to the paper, hiding the fact that the paper is accepted is un-ethical. The e-mail address looks fine to me as long as it is legitimate. – scaaahu Apr 27 '15 at 9:54
  • possible duplicate of E-mail address to use in publications – Stephan Kolassa Apr 27 '15 at 10:00
  • Right, I'm of course aware of that. But my question was specifically related to email. The paper is accepted and there's no affiliation to the university except the studies being done as an undergraduate. Would I use the students email, or are there other options? – Luca Matteis Apr 27 '15 at 10:00
  • @StephanKolassa thanks but it's different (already read that). That question talks about "rotting emails" and the possibility of using your personal email to avoid that. My question is regarding what email I should provide for a research that I want my university to be affiliated with. – Luca Matteis Apr 27 '15 at 10:01
  • I did read your question and the one I believe is a duplicate. That question and the answers explicitly address the issue of whether a gmail or other address looks unprofessional, and of course you will provide your affiliation apart from your email address (there are enough institutions that are not obvious from their domains). In summary, I don't see how your question is appreciably different from the one I linked. Let's see whether four other people here follow your or my argument ;-) – Stephan Kolassa Apr 27 '15 at 10:06
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Use your university address, even if it is weird and complicated. Nobody will hold an official bureaucratic policy of your university against you.

You may, however, wish to see if your university supports email aliases. Many universities have an official "full" email address, but also a shorter and easier version. Others allow you to activate your alumni account even while still a student, and you might then use that alternate (and persistent!) address.

Separately: do not hide your paper from your professor. Assuming your professor is basically ethical, then either a) your professor should be an author and will explain why you should add them, or b) your professor should not be an author, in which case they'll celebrate you without asking to be added.

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