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The below is in a paper I am reading, written by Gareis.

One of the uppermost complaints of study-abroad students remains the lack of meaningful contact with host nationals (e.g., Gareis, 1995; Klineberg & Hull, 1979; Marginson, Nyland, Sawir, & Forbes-Mewett, 2010; Ward & Masgoret, 2004; Yashima, Zenuk-Nishide, & Shimizu, 2004).

Can I site this in my own paper as:

Many international students complain about a lack of meaningful contact with host nationals (Gareis, 2010).

  • Some possible other options include "(for a review see Gareis, 2010)" if that feels appropriate, or "(e.g. x)" where x is the most relevant of the citations in the long list. – WetlabStudent Mar 28 '15 at 18:23
  • Thanks. For a review doesn't seem appropriate because Gareis doesn't exactly review those authors herself. I guess I'm going to have to pick one of the most relevant and use it in addition to Gareis since Gareis's is where I found this info. Something like (e.g., Gareis, 2010, Ward & Masgoret, 2004). – user3763950 Mar 28 '15 at 18:52
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One approach is to cite Gareis (2010) as the source of the other citations:

According to Gareis (2010), many international students complain about a lack of meaningful contact with host nationals (cited by Gareis, 2010: Gareis, 1995; Klineberg & Hull, 1979; Marginson, Nyland, Sawir, & Forbes-Mewett, 2010; Ward & Masgoret, 2004; Yashima, Zenuk-Nishide, & Shimizu, 2004).

If you use this approach, then you need to include ALL these in your References list (a.k.a. Bibliography). In this case it would be 6 references total.

This approach is most useful if these specific sources are important for your purposes, either because they establish credibility, present details, or make important connections to lines of research or results.

Another approach is to omit the specific citations by Gareis (2010), but also to note that you omitted them.

According to Gareis (2010), many international students complain about a lack of meaningful contact with host nationals (five citations in Gareis, 2010 omitted).

This approach is most useful when you only need the main citation as support of the statement and the specific citations are not useful or necessary for your paper or for the reader. In this approach, you'd only have one entry in your reference list for Gareis (2010).

  • I do not think in APA style you included the primary sources when citing a secondary source, so it is probably best to check the relevant style guide when citing secondary sources. – StrongBad Mar 29 '15 at 9:55
  • I think StrongBad is right - I just spoke to a Reference Librarian at my institution and she indicated that my original intuition was acceptable. – user3763950 Mar 29 '15 at 22:14
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A good strategy is to make it clear that the cited article is a review article that summarises other studies. So for example, you could write:

Gareis (2010) reviewed the literature and found that one of the uppermost complaints of study-abroad students remains the lack of meaningful contact with host nationals.

Or

One of the uppermost complaints of study-abroad students remains the lack of meaningful contact with host nationals (for a review see Gareis, 2010).

This is part of good citation practice whereby you show the link between statement and citation. The aim is to give the reader an understanding of the evidence provided by the citation.

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