2

I would like to know what are the main differences between the introductory part of a paper and of a thesis. My thesis would be a sandwich type, so I would have to wrap everything there.

Some of the differences are:

  • Longer in thesis.
  • Deeper in thesis. Extended definition of key terms, concepts and methodology in thesis.
  • Clear definition of the whole goal in thesis, whereas paper smaller goal.

To narrow the possible answers, I do research on the molecular aspects of the infection steps of a pathogenic swine bacteria. Also develop strategies to block infection by using vaccines.

  • Note there is no much information about this, so would be useful for others. – biotech Feb 25 '15 at 11:32
  • Although there is a post with some guidelines about writing a thesis introduction, they are also common to paper introduction. What I'm looking for is for aspects that are more different between them. academia.stackexchange.com/questions/12170/… – biotech Feb 25 '15 at 11:39
3

From a structural point of view, there is no major difference. An introduction should set the work in a wider context starting by establishing the wider context and showing the need for the work done and identifying the knowledge gap that is filled. What is different concerns the matter since a thesis introduction should focus on the thesis not the individual studies (articles/manuscripts).

If the articles/manuscripts all are very tightly tied, then it is probably easier to write the introduction. If the articles are more disparate, which is not uncommon, then trying to tie everything together can be more challenging.The stumbling block for most is that they have not thought about the wider perspective and some do not even manage well to include it in the articles/manuscripts themselves. So I would say that the difficulty does not lie with the fact that it is a thesis introduction per se but rather that many do not see the forest for all the trees while they write the articles/manuscripts to be included in the thesis.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.