0

This question already has an answer here:

Folks, I have received my phd from a university ranked 60 in usnews and had one year of post doc work after. Right now I am a non tenure track teaching professor at a wellknown university. Eversince I was student I had a dream of being in MIT, Stanford, Caltech or UC berkley. However, since I was neither genius nor rich, I was not able to do this. I even had a phd admission from USC but since it was partially funded I was not able to attend. Anyways, now that I am done with everything, I am still thinking of doing another phd in the above mentioned universities. But, I do not want to leave my current position since I really enjoy teaching and do not want to risk my future for just a dream. A solution I come up is to get a phd while I am working and this is only possible if the above universities are offering online phds. My field is civil engineering and due to my research area I am also interested in applied math. So far I was not able to find any top rank university that offers civil eng. or math completely online. I can get a phd in math from the university that I am teaching with a tuition waver but it is not really what i want. The best university for online math is University of Washington. But university of Washington is not a top rank university and I do not know if it is worth my time and money.

Any suggestions highly appreciated. And please do not call me a loser for trying to get a second phd. :D

Regards, Jason Ray

marked as duplicate by jakebeal, scaaahu, xLeitix, ff524 Feb 15 '15 at 8:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 4
    If you already know how to do research then there isn't much to gain from a second PhD. Also, I don't see a question here. – Austin Henley Feb 15 '15 at 4:31
  • There are a number of other questions on this site suggesting that a second PhD does not significantly improve career prospects. I think this is particularly true if it's in the same field as your first. There are other posts suggesting that an online PhD is unlikely to be worthwhile as far as quality and research experience. And finally, I think it would be a huge challenge for anyone to start and finish a PhD while holding down a full time job (and academic teaching jobs usually take well over 40 hours per week). I hate to say it, but I think you've got the trifecta. – Nate Eldredge Feb 15 '15 at 4:31
0

Eversince I was student I had a dream of being in MIT, Stanford, Caltech or UC berkley. However, since I was neither genius nor rich, I was not able to do this. I even had a phd admission from USC but since it was partially funded I was not able to attend.

I do not agree that you need to be genius or rich to attend the mentioned schools. The brain functions exactly like muscles; the more you use it, the better it gets in learning. Please never try to divide human beings into dump ones and smart ones. Those people made it to the top ranked school because they tried/studied very hard and never gave up. Let's admit that you did not try/study as hard as they did. Honestly, people who go to MIT, Stanford, ... are humans just like us; let's not try to say that they come from another world.

You said that you did your Phd at a good university and you also work at a good university. If I were you, I would not go to those schools for a second Phd but instead I would try very hard to succeed in my research/teaching so that I would be better than those who went to the top ranked schools. After all, once you are a successful researcher in your field, no one cares where you did your Phd and once you are in that position, then the top schools want you to work for them.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.