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Let's say I have the following paragraph:

Smith (2011) contends that blah blah blah. Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. This allows for one to decide that monkeys are actually fish.

Everything in blahs is paraphrased from Smith (2011), but the conclusion that monkeys are actually fish is my own idea. How do I mark where Smith's ideas end and my ideas start?

  • Are you in a field that hates the active voice and/or first person? If not, you can say something like, "Based on this, we/I suggest that monkeys are fish." – ff524 Dec 3 '14 at 6:26
  • I feel that this would become very redundant (and I would like to refrain from using the first person) – The Obscure Question Dec 3 '14 at 6:39
  • 1) Use block quote to separate them; 2) Put your statement at the beginning rather than the end; 3) Don't start with Smith, but other pronoun such as "Researchers," "A study on..." then close the quotes with (Smith, 2011), then write your own conjecture; 4) Use just "Smith" without year, then close the quotes with (Smith, 2011), then write your own conjecture. – Penguin_Knight Dec 3 '14 at 13:53
1

Use a conditional construction to indicate distance from the cited claim. E.g.,

Smith (2011) contends that blah blah blah. Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. If Smith's contention were true, it would follow that monkeys are actually fish.

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